No. 2: Develop professional relationships

Networking may be an overemphasized principle in certain situations, but there is no denying the power of professional relationships.

If you want to make yourself valuable at work, you should do your best to be a known quantity. This may be accomplished by seeking out work situations that involve other people and various departments. Or it may be as simple as making the rounds every so often in order to connect with people.

This doesn't mean that people should spend their days roaming the halls and chit-chatting instead of working. However, networking may create a situation where the employee is well liked, which can again lead to some level of sentimental attachment if several people are making decisions about staff changes.

Still, the reality is that none of this will work unless the person displays a particular personality ...

Office workers laughing in meeting

No. 1: Have a good attitude

The reality of work is that attitude matters. Some people may respect the skilled person with the strong or difficult personality. However, they will not necessarily enjoy working with him on a daily basis.

People have enough drama in their lives and they do not necessarily want to deal with co-workers who regularly create conflict or tense work situations.

While it may be difficult to manufacture a "nice" personality, that doesn't mean that people shouldn't try.

If a company is trying to decide between two people of equal skills and vocational worth, chances are they are going to make a gut decision based on personality.

Therefore, you should do your best to have a positive attitude so that you can build quality relationships with other people and continue to be perceived as a valuable asset in the organization.