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  • Health Beat: Cancer treatment unclogs patient's heart

    Health Beat: Cancer treatment unclogs patient's heart

    Every year, surgeons use balloons and stents to open the arteries of nearly one million Americans. For about 10 percent of those patients, the arteries will re-narrow, meaning additional procedures. In some cases, doctors are using a small dose of a common cancer treatment to keep those arteries clear.

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  • Health Beat: Fixing frozen shoulder syndrome

    Health Beat: Fixing frozen shoulder syndrome

    It's a very painful condition that most of us have never heard of. Frozen shoulder syndrome often comes on with little warning and can limit a person's everyday activities. The condition may mimic arthritis, but early diagnosis and treatment can help patients get on the road to recovery.

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  • Health Beat: Stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis

    Health Beat: Stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis in the United States, affecting nearly 27 million adults. It is currently an incurable disease in which the joints deteriorate. Now, a therapy that has been used in eye surgery and to heal the skin of burn victims is being used for the first time in knees. This new form of treatment involves stem cells from amniotic fluid.

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  • Health Beat: Stem cells treat baldness with PRP

    Health Beat: Stem cells treat baldness with PRP

    Americans spend between $1 billion and $4 billion a year treating hair loss. Now, four surgeons in the United States are testing a stem cell treatment in a non-surgical procedure. Overseas trials in Japan and Egypt are already showing some success.

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  • Health Beat: BioUni: Bone transplant saves knee

    Health Beat: BioUni: Bone transplant saves knee

    More than four million Americans are living with an artificial knee. It's a solution that relieves the chronic pain of a worn-out joint, but the metal replacements last for only 10 to 20 years, meaning it's not a good option for everyone. Now, there's a new therapy that experts say could help young adults and even teens who are struggling with damaged knees.

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