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Health Beat: A new way to banish panic attacks

Sweaty palms, spinning head, racing heart and blocked lungs. That's how someone having a panic or anxiety attack describes the sudden, intense changes they go through. But now, a new device is training patients to breathe better and banish panic attacks.

Health Beat: HeartFlow test: Game-changing diagnostic

More than 16 million Americans suffer from coronary artery disease. It develops when a buildup of plaque cuts off blood flow to the heart, causing shortness of breath, chest pain, heart attacks and death. Now, a new FDA-approved test could change the way the disease is diagnosed and treated.

Health Beat: Restart the heart: No touching

Health Beat Restart the heart No touching

Like the name suggests, sudden cardiac arrest can come on without warning and is a leading cause of death for adults over the age of 40. For people who may be at risk, doctors may suggest an implantable defibrillator. Now, there's a new option that can automatically restart a person’s heart — without touching it.

HealthBeat: SculpSure fat melter

SculpSure

A new body contouring treatment on the market is exciting for both patients and their doctors. It's called SculpSure. There's no surgery involved; doctors use lasers in this FDA-approved procedure that takes less time than a leisurely lunch break.

Health Beat: Personalized cancer treatment: It's in your DNA

When someone goes through chemotherapy and radiation to fight cancer, the most devastating news is that the cancer has come back, but now, thanks to groundbreaking treatments tailored to each individual patient's genetic makeup, some may have new hope.

Health Beat: Invasion of super lice

Health Beat Invasion of super lice

It's bad enough for the estimated 12 million parents who hear every year their child has a head full of lice, but this school year, the story gets worse: so-called super lice have taken over half the country and are resistant to over-the-counter treatments.

Health Beat: Lynparza for advanced ovarian cancer

Lynparza

This year alone, 21,000 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Of those, 14,000 will die. Because the symptoms are so subtle, most women aren't diagnosed until they are in the late stages of the disease. Now, there is a new treatment that is bringing hope to some patients who have exhausted all other options.

Health Beat: Mouthlab: Check your health?

They are the signs of your overall health -- things like body temperature, heart rate and blood pressure. Many of us get these measurements done during an annual exam. Bioengineers have now developed a user-friendly way to gather all this information quickly, potentially uncovering life-threatening conditions earlier than ever before.

Health Beat: Immunotherapy: Fighting advanced cancer

Patients with advanced cancers have new hope thanks to immunotherapy. It's a therapy that trains the body's own immune system to search out and destroy the cancer cells. Researchers say they've found an accurate way to screen the patients who may respond well to this treatment.

Health Beat: DUOPA for Parkinson's patients

Patients with advanced Parkinson's disease can have an increasingly tough time regulating their medication. Now, they may have a better way to keep their drugs and their daily lives more consistent with DUOPA, which recently received FDA approval.

Health Beat: Safety net for peanut allergies

Health Beat Safety net for peanut allergies

You've heard of fighting fire with fire. How about treating peanut allergies with peanuts? It's a new approach to a potentially deadly threat that terrifies parents of allergic children. One brave child is helping researchers in their search for a peanut allergy cure.

Health Beat: Tips to curb your appetite

Glass of water, filter

Ferre' Dollar/CNN

We've all heard about too many "miracle diets" that promise much and often deliver little, but the "eating experts" — clinical dieticians — say it is possible to eat less, lose weight and keep it off.

Health Beat: Fighting epilepsy

Health Beat Fighting epilepsy

One in 26 people will develop epilepsy at some point in their lives. The disease causes seizures and affects more than three million people in the United States. Two-thirds of them can control their seizures with medications, but the rest must seek other options. Now, advancements in brain surgery could prove to be the cure those patients have been seeking.

Health Beat: UV robot fights hospital infections

It's a challenge for busy hospitals around the country -- get a sick patient into a room as fast as possible, but still ensure the room is sanitized and safe. Now, new research shows using a special high-tech system is an effective way to reduce the risk of contracting C. diff, and other life-threatening infections.

Health Beat: Autism Village app: Kirby's playground

When you're raising a child with autism, many parents say it takes more than a village. Well, there's one local father who set out to make that journey as safe and fun as possible for children and their parents. 

Health Beat: Digital dentistry: S-RAY to replace X-ray

Cleaning, drilling, and the dreaded X-rays. It's all part of going to the dentist, but now, one part of your checkup could soon get a whole lot better.

Health Beat: Pre-diabetes: 5 changes to make now

Twenty-nine million Americans have diabetes, putting them at risk for stroke and heart attack, but you probably didn't know that 86 million Americans have pre-diabetes, meaning they have elevated blood sugar, and because there are no signs, many don't even know they are at risk.

Health Beat: Hepatitis C: The costly cure

Millions of Americans have hepatitis C, a chronic disease that ravages your liver and, in some cases, can be deadly. New drugs can cure the virus, but that's good news for only some people.

Health Beat: Anorexia: A gut feeling

More than 30 million people are suffering from some form of an eating disorder such as anorexia or bulimia. Much research has focused on the brain and the mental aspect of the disease, but new research shows there may also be a biological reason. Researchers have shown why what's going on in the gut may influence what's going on in the brain.

Health Beat: Cancer vaccine: Old dog, new tricks

As every dog owner knows, they're a part of the family, so when one gets cancer, it's heartbreaking, but an experimental drug is helping them live longer, and it may be good news for children with cancer, as well.

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