There's been mixed reaction to President Obama's so-called contraceptive compromise.
Officials from Planned Parenthood say they support the change, as does the head of a group representing Catholic hospitals.

But the US Conference of Bishops says it's too soon to say if the changes will meet the needs of the Catholic Church.

And locally, Catholic institutions are speaking out.

Officials at DeSales University had said they didn't think the University would comply if the policy was legalized. Officials explained the policy change today saying it is a conflict between beliefs, and the actual living out of one's faith.

"A tough balance that people have to have between what we think, what we believe, or what we affirm, as a concept or as an idea and how that actually, where that rubber hits the road in terms of what we do in life," said Father Thomas Dailey, director of the Salesian Center at DeSales University.

Officials from the Diocese of Allentown say they'll wait until details of the president's plan are finalized before commenting.

The change comes after the White House was put under enormous election-year pressure about its new rules regarding contraception coverage and insurance benefits.

President Obama says he has revamped his birth control policy to protect religious liberties and a woman's right to access contraception.

Now, the new rule changes will not force religious employers to cover birth control for their employees against the church's beliefs. That would include a Catholic hospital it would still not apply to a Church which is exempt.

Instead, the government will demand insurance companies be responsible for providing free coverage to women who work at those institutions.

The White House did not outline who will ultimately pay for this program.