SMYRNA, Del. -

We endure some pretty harsh winters here in the Northeast. But many don't stick around for the weather.

It's time to fly south for the winter.

"They find places along the Delaware Bay, along the Atlantic flyway, where they can stop, rest and feed. Now the ducks and geese will stay here as long as they can," said Tina Watson, Bombay Hook National Wildlfe Refuge.

The refuge is located in Smyrna, Delaware is a migratory resort. With 16,000 acres, it's part of the Atlantic flyway, the main route most birds take as they migrate north and south in this area.

For some birds, it's a long trip, from the northern part of Canada to the southernmost tip of South America.

The refuge is a place for the birds to rest, and a place for people to watch them.

The terrain is flat here, and there are good viewing spots for viewing. There are several 30-foot-high observation decks.

Back on the ground, there's a 12-mile auto tour which is 10-feet above sea level. To the left are the fresh water man-made empoundments.

The water level can be manipulated to suit the birds' needs.

To the right: 13,000 acres of tidal salt marsh. Beyond that, the Delaware Bay.