Berks

Some in Berks still await news on fate of loved ones

'I don't know,' Marta Mercado tells 69 News

Some in Berks still await news on...

READING, Pa. - Nearly one month after Hurricane Maria's landfall in Puerto Rico, concerns and uncertainty have not washed away. Most of the island is still in the dark. Resources like water are scarce, and even some of what little water they have can't be trusted because of contaminants. 

In Reading, relatives of those in suffering in Puerto Rico feel helpless, only able to hear what their families are going through.

"It's like a war zone," said Marta Mercado, who has family in Puerto Rico.

"[My sister] saw a lot of down trees, a lot of people that needed water and food and I guess medicines and stuff like that because the hospitals are real bad, too."

Mercado said she has three sisters, a brother, and many nieces on the island. She said she's only been able to make contact with one sister and one niece.

"They told me they were OK, but I don't know what happened to the rest of my family. I don't know," she said. 

Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rossello said power will be back, but it will be a process. 

"The government has aggressive expectations," Rossello said. "They are expectations I have established. They expect to have 30 percent by the end of the month, 50 percent by the middle of next month, 80 percent by early December and 90 percent before Christmas. These expectations are possible being very, very aggressive, but they are consistent with the physical distribution of energy that we can do."


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