READING, Pa. -

Reading City Council introduced the fourth addendum to the lease agreement with the Reading Area Water Authority (RAWA) Monday night following a press conference held by the two groups introducing the preliminary agreement.

“The terms of the new agreement provide for additional oversight and protection of the system that Council has always desired,” said Francis Acosta, Council president.

Following Monday's introduction of the preliminary agreement, the ordinance can now be enacted pending the outcome of the vote at the Aug. 11 Council meeting. 

Also, in order to make progress on other major projects in the city, multiple contracts were awarded at the meeting.

Eastern Environmental Contractors, Inc. was awarded a contract in the amount of $4.6 million for the general contractor’s work on the digester project for the wastewater treatment plant.

The electrical contractor’s work was awarded for the same project to PSI Pumping Solutions at the price of $240,200 at the recommendation of the project’s engineer. 

Council is currently waiting to receive and review analysis from financial consultant PFM on the redevelopment of certain properties along Penn Street.

The goal for the redevelopment, according to Council, is to bring in more jobs and new businesses to the Reading area.

Once council receives the analysis, it will consider designating Our City Reading, Inc. as the City’s redevelopment partner, and council will also give the mayor the authority to apply for federal aid in the form of grants and loans.

Council also passed a resolution directing the mayor to execute the Memorandum of Understanding between the city of Reading and the Foundation for the Reading Pagoda, an agreement Council passed in December 2013 but which has not received approval from the mayor.

The City has also partnered with the Berks County Solid Waste Authority to provide for a program that allows for electronic recyclables to be separated, stored, and transported to be disposed of in a proper fashion.

Additionally, ordinances were passed to place stop signs at four different intersections throughout the city.