BETHLEHEM, Pa. -

Thousands of students have returned to Lehigh University for the start of a new school year, but this year, they'll find more security measures in place to keep them safe.

The university's police department has teamed up with Bethlehem Police to offer more surveillance and patrol services.

"To put students and the community at ease," said Chief Edward Shupp with the Lehigh University Police Department

The university is installing ten additional security cameras in high pedestrian areas.

Those cameras will feed directly into the campus and Bethlehem police dispatch centers.

By the end of the year, the university said there will be close to 70 cameras, facing on and off campus.

"It's really nice to know the university is kind of watching over us. If something were to happen it would be recorded," said Alex Stephanou, a student.

"That's a great step in the right direction. More visibility, more data is going to lead to better enforcement," said Joe Dille, a student.

There are also close to 70 city-installed cameras throughout Bethlehem.

Officials said there will be more patrols from both departments.

Recently, Lehigh launched the Emergensee App on campus.

It allows students to feed back their locations and live stream video directly to campus dispatchers.

Already, close to 900 people have loaded it onto their phones.

"I think it's really comforting to know you can get right in touch with someone," Stephanou said.

Students said they are grateful for the added comforts, at a time when they worry about safety around campus.

"You hear a lot of crime in the Bethlehem area, and some of it specifically happening to Lehigh students," Stephanou said.

"I have been robbed repeatedly in the past. Some of my friends have been victims of some very tough burglaries. I don't want to be in that position again," Dille said.

Last month, police said a student was brutally attacked and nearly killed inside her off-campus apartment.

A 17-year-old is facing charges including attempted rape and attempted homicide.

"Students are nervous. Especially, when they hear about stuff like that," Stephanou said.