HARRISBURG, Pa. -

Pennsylvania's controversial voter ID law has been struck down.

A state judge said Friday that the law that would require voters to provide photo ID at the polls is unconstitutional.

69 News spoke with people who are praising the decision and others who are disappointed.

"It's good news for us, very happy, us meaning the 8.2 million people in Pennsylvania," said Bar Johnston with the Lehigh County Democratic Party.

"I don't see why there's a problem with just acting responsibly and providing ID when you go vote," said Wanda Mercado-Arroyo, a Republican who is part of the Governor's Advisory Commission on Latino Affairs.

Enforcement of the law has been barred since 2012. The judge said the requirement places an unreasonable burden on the fundamental right to vote. One part of the decision says, "Voting laws are designed to assure a free and fair election. The Voter ID Law does not further this goal."

"It's just bad. It's a bad law. It's bad legislation. It shouldn't happen," said Johnston. "What it was doing was disenfranchising people so for example seniors that don't have a drivers license or photo ID, military people that don't have photo ID."

"It's a commonsense law. Nowadays, for anything you do, you need ID," said Mercado-Arroyo. "For credit card use, you need an ID. To go to the hospital, you need an ID. To do so many things, you need an ID, so I don't see anything wrong with it."

The decision is expected to be appealed to the Pennsylvania Supreme Court.

The chairman of the Pennsylvania Republican Party, Rob Gleason, released the following statement.

“The overwhelming majority of Pennsylvanians support a way to protect their right to vote and combat voter fraud. While I am extremely disappointed with today’s decision, the Republican Party of Pennsylvania will continue to serve as a leading advocate for policies that ensure a fair right to vote for all Pennsylvanians."

The following statement was released by the Pennsylvania Democratic party chairman Jim Burn.

"Today, a judge ruled that Tom Corbett's controversial Voter ID presented an "unreasonable burden" to voters. It was clear from the introduction of this bill that Voter ID was simply a blatant, political scheme designed to confuse and disenfranchise Pennsylvania voters.

This decision is a big step forward for making sure our elections are fair and a testament to the thousands of Pennsylvanians who worked hard to make sure everyone's vote would be counted. Yet our work is not done. Since Republicans cannot win elections the fair way, we are prepared to continue to reveal the truth about Tom Corbett's voter ID scheme through any appeals or further attempts to rig elections in our Commonwealth."