SOUTH BEND, Ind. -

This may be the strangest twist in a tale overflowing with strangeness.

Manti Te'o's deceased girlfriend tweeted late Wednesday night.

On a Twitter account -- not verified, naturally -- the "girlfriend" said the "myths" about the story that has sports fans scratching their heads will be addressed Thursday.

Whatever she says, she'll find it hard to top what's already come out about the Notre Dame linebacker and the woman he called the "love of my life."

First, sports website Deadspin published a piece dismissing as a hoax the existence of Te'o's girlfriend -- the one who he said died around the same time as his real-life grandmother while his team marched toward the BCS National Championship Game.

Then Wednesday, the university held a press conference saying Te'o was the victim of a "elaborate hoax." And Te'o, the Heisman Trophy runner-up, released a statement saying he was embarrassed that he was the victim of a "sick joke."

The bizarre developments left many wondering if they, instead of Te'o, were led on -- and whether the heralded linebacker was in on it.

"Te'o's story that he is completely innocent in this does not really ring true to us," Timothy Burke, co-author of the Deadspin article, told CNN's Anderson Cooper Wednesday night.

The hoax

The story of the girlfriend came to light in September as Notre Dame continued its improbable undefeated season and Te'o, a relentless tackler, was beginning to emerge as a frontrunner for the prestigous Heisman Trophy.

He led the Fighting Irish, amassing multiple double-digit tackle games and becoming the face of one of the best defenses in the nation.

In September and October, Te'o told interviewers that his girlfriend and his grandmother had died within hours of each other. The girlfriend, Lennay Kekua, a 22-year-old Stanford University student who had been in a serious car crash, died of leukemia, he said.

The twin losses inspired him to honor them with sterling play on the field, Te'o said. He led his team to a 20-3 routing of Michigan State after he heard the news.

"I miss 'em, but I know that I'll see them again one day," he told ESPN.

It was indeed a gripping interest story of determination. And the media ran with it.

No one bothered to seek out Kekua's family to ask how they felt about the way Te'o was honoring their daughter. Until Deadspin, acting on an anonymous e-mail it received last week, started poking around.

"What do you do when you first want to know something, you Google it, right?" Burke said on CNN. "And Google searches for 'Lennay Kekua' only showed up articles about her dying, and inspiring Mant'i Teo.

"There's no evidence of her existing in any way, other than, you know, after she had allegedly died. And we thought that was a little weird."

Te'o's grandmother did in fact die in September, Deadspin said. But there was no Social Security Administration record of Kekua's death.

The website called mortuaries and funeral homes in Carson, California, where Kekua was reportedly buried -- but came up empty. They sought out the person whose picture had been presented as that of Kekua and tracked her down.

She was alive, didn't have leukemia and had never met Te'o.

"That sort of opened everything up," Burke said.

The revelation prompted the athletics director of Notre Dame to call a news conference Wednesday. There was no way for Te'o to know the relationship was a hoax because it had been conducted strictly online and on the phone, said director Jack Swarbrick.

The pair had set up several meetings, including in Hawaii, where Te'o grew up -- but Kekua never showed, Swarbrick said.

The university said it did not know how many people were in on the ruse.