According to a YouGov poll, one-third of females and one-quarter of males have been called ‘crazy’ or ‘insane’ in a serious manner by a romantic partner. These hurtful words escalate into phrases that can be translated to one term, so newly used that it was a runner up for Oxford Dictionary’s most popular words in 2018. However, 75 percent of Americans have never heard the term before!

Here's what to do if you think you’re a victim of gaslighting.

“You’re imagining things. I didn’t say that!” “You don’t know anything about money.” “You’re being so sensitive.” These are common phrases of gaslighting, which is manipulating someone by having them question their thoughts, memories, and current events, so much so that they question their own sanity.

“It made me question who I was and what was going on within me,” said Mary Mitchell.

Gaslighters typically target their victim because they either have something to hide, want to avoid conflict, have a different opinion, or feel threatened that they could lose the relationship.

Start with identifying the problem. Journal instances that they try to distort and keep dates and times as proof. Counteract their comment by asking a question yourself. Or reach out to a friend or therapist. And if you notice someone being gaslighted, don’t be afraid to speak up!

Another way to track how you feel is through an app called Mood Meter. Created by researchers at Yale, you’re able to learn about your emotions, notice patterns, and understand what may cause your feelings over time.

If you are still feeling like you are being gaslighted, contact the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233.