A look at which U.S. states are leading at vaccinating against the coronavirus and which states are struggling is beginning to resemble America's electoral map. Vaccination numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show states that tend to vote Democratic at the top in terms of the percentage of their adult population that have received at least one shot. At the bottom are five Republican-leaning states, including Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana. A poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research in late March found that Republicans were three times as likely as Democrats to say they will probably or definitely not get vaccinated.

The Biden administration is beginning to undo a Trump-era ban on clinics referring women for abortions. That policy directive led to Planned Parenthood leaving the federal family planning program. Wednesday's proposed rule through on President Joe Biden’s campaign promise to reverse his predecessor’s family planning policy. The Trump-era rule approach was branded a “gag rule” by women’s groups and decried by medical associations as violating the doctor-patient relationship. But the Biden administration is stopping short of immediately suspending the Trump regulation, as abortion rights advocates had sought. Officials believe methodically rewriting the Trump rule will increase the odds of Biden's changes ultimately being upheld in court.

French President Emmanuel Macron, wearing a protective face mask, talks during a meeting with medical staff members during a visit in a child psychiatry department at Reims hospital, eastern France, to discuss the psychological impact of the COVID-19 crisis and the lockdown on children and teenagers in France, Wednesday, April 14, 2021. (Christian Hartmann/Pool via AP)

French President Emmanuel Macron, wearing a protective face mask, talks during a meeting with medical staff members during a visit in a child psychiatry department at Reims hospital, eastern France, to discuss the psychological impact of the COVID-19 crisis and the lockdown on children and teenagers in France, Wednesday, April 14, 2021. (Christian Hartmann/Pool via AP)

European countries are diverging on whether to push ahead with giving residents Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine after reports of very rare blood clots in a handful of recipients in the United States. Some leaders opted for caution Wednesday after U.S. officials paused the vaccine's use while they study the clots in a handful of people. Experts agree COVID-19 poses a much larger risk of death and hospitalization than the potential threat of atypical clots. Italy, the Netherlands, Croatia and Denmark put their Johnson & Johnson lots in storage while waiting for guidance from European health officials. But Poland and France said they would administer the doses they received.  

U.S. health officials are weighing next steps as they investigate a handful of unusual blood clots in people who received Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine. The reports are exceedingly rare — so far, six cases out of more than 7 million inoculations. And it's not clear if they are really linked to the J&J vaccine. European regulators have declared such clots a rare but possible risk with another vaccine that's made in a similar way, from AstraZeneca. Wednesday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention debated in a public meeting how to handle the J&J vaccine while authorities investigate.

A leading mental health expert and commentator has a book deal his publisher says will be an authoritative yet compassionate guide to managing mental health challenges caused by the pandemic. Dr. Ken Duckworth’s “You Are Not Alone” is scheduled for the Fall 2022. The book draws in part on Duckworth's own childhood and his father having bipolar disorder. It's the first announced release by Zando, an independent publisher founded last year by former Crown executive Molly Stern. Before departing Crown in 2018 amid a corporate realignment, Stern published such blockbusters as Michelle Obama’s “Becoming,” Andy Weir’s “The Martian” and Gillian Flynn’s “Gone Girl.”  

French President Emmanuel Macron talks to a child as he visits a child psychiatry department at Reims hospital, eastern France, to discuss the psychological impact of the COVID-19 crisis and the lockdown on children and teenagers in France, Wednesday, April 14, 2021. (Christian Hartmann/Pool via AP)