CORONAVIRUS: US and World

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The White House is moving to pressure state and local governments to swiftly adopt policies to protect renters after an eviction moratorium expired over the weekend. That could potentially push millions of Americans out of their homes. In a statement on Monday, the White House emphasized that the federal government has provided $46.5 billion to keep renters in their homes. But it accused states and cities of being “too slow to act,” preventing that aid from making its way to tenants whose livelihoods have been upended by the pandemic. The focus on states comes as President Joe Biden faces stinging criticism, including from some in his own party, that he was was slow to address the end of the moratorium. Read more

Landlords and tenants are rushing back to court and advocates are bracing for a wave of evictions following the end of the federal moratorium over the weekend. Most advocates expect evictions to build slowly over the coming weeks and months as the bureaucracy of removing people from their homes restarts Monday. The Biden administration announced Thursday it would allow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention moratorium to expire. It argued that its hands were tied after the Supreme Court signaled the measure needed to come to an end. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has called for the moratorium to be extended. Read more

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Sen. Lindsey Graham has tested positive for the coronavirus. The South Carolina Republican is the first senator to disclose a breakthrough infection after being vaccinated. He says he is “very glad” he received the vaccine, without which his current symptoms would be “far worse.” Graham says he “started having flu-like symptoms Saturday night” and went to the doctor Monday morning. Graham says he will quarantine for 10 days and describes his current symptoms as “mild." Graham’s infection comes on the heels of updated CDC guidance urging even fully vaccinated people to return to wearing masks indoors in areas of high coronavirus transmission. Read more

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks closed mixed on Wal… Read more

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A federal appeals court has ruled that Indiana University can proceed with its plan to require students and employees to get vaccinated for COVID-19. Monday's ruling is the highest court decision regarding college immunization mandates. The Chicago-based appeals court upheld a district court judge’s ruling that found that the university was acting reasonably “in pursuing public health and safety for its campus communities.” Both courts rejected a request by eight IU students who sought to block the requirement while they challenge its legality, claiming it would violate their constitutional rights by forcing them to receive unwanted medical treatment. The plaintiffs' lawyer says he will ask the Supreme Court to consider the case. Read more