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President Joe Biden and Japan Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga are showcasing the alliance between their two countries as well as their shared resolve in dealing with China. The two met Friday at the White House in Biden's first face-to-face talks with a foreign leader as president. The talks featured unusually frank warnings from a Japanese leader against any effort by China to dominate the Indo-Pacific region by “force or coercion.” Suga and Biden were seeking to challenge messaging from Chinese President Xi Jinping that America and democracies in general are on the decline following the political turmoil and international withdrawal that marked Donald Trump’s presidency. Read more

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The coroner's office has released the names of the eight people who were fatally shot when a man opened fire at a FedEx plant in Indianapolis. Four of the victims of Thursday's shooting were from Indianapolis' Sikh community. The mass shooting marks another blow for the Asian American community in the United States. It comes a month after six people of Asian descent were killed in a mass shooting in the Atlanta area and amid ongoing attacks against Asian Americans during the coronavirus pandemic. The shooter has been identified as a 19-year-old former employee of FedEx. Police say he killed himself after shooting his victims.  Read more

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Newly released transcripts show that prosecutors overseeing a grand jury investigation into the death of Daniel Prude last year in Rochester, New York, undercut the case for criminal charges with testimony from a medical expert who said police officers who held Prude to the ground didn’t do anything wrong. The grand jury voted 15-5 not to charge the three officers involved in Prude's restraint. Prude stopped breathing as officers held him down with a hood over his face. New York Attorney General Letitia James had said in February, in announcing the grand jury’s decision, that the state had put on the best case it could. Read more

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Raul Castro says he is stepping down as head of Cuba’s Communist Party, ending an era of formal leadership by he and his brother Fidel Castro that began with the 1959 revolution. Castro made the announcement Friday in a speech at the opening of the Eighth congress of the ruling party, the only one allowed on the island. Castro didn’t say who he would endorse as his successor as first secretary of the Communist Party, but he previously has indicated that he favors yielding control to Miguel Díaz-Canel, who succeeded him as president in 2018. Read more

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A California woman has said in a jailhouse interview that she drowned her three young children to protect them from abuse by their father in the midst of a custody battle. Liliana Carrillo was interviewed Thursday by KGET-TV. Carrillo alleges that the father, Erik Denton, sexually abused the children and that she regrets killing them but felt it was the only way to keep them safe. Custody case court documents say Denton denied abusing the children and that the mother was delusional. The children were found dead Saturday. Carrillo hasn’t been charged in their deaths but was arrested and has pleaded not guilty to carjacking. Read more

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President Joe Biden and celebrities including Billy Crystal and Lin-Manuel Miranda are part of a TV special aimed at boosting COVID-19 vaccination rates. The special, “Roll Up Your Sleeves,” airs at 7 p.m. Eastern Sunday on NBC. Biden will make a direct appeal in support of the vaccine effort, while former President Barack Obama will join with basketball greats Charles Barkley and Shaquille O’Neal to add their voices to the effort. The network said the hour-long program will include Matthew McConaughey interviewing Dr. Anthony Fauci to help separate “fact from fiction” about the vaccines. Also set to appear are Joe Jonas, Demi Lovato and Amanda Seyfried.  Read more

A high school in New Mexico returned to remote learning Friday as the school district investigates an off-campus “secret prom." Officials said the event in Las Cruces violated state mandates intended to curb the spread of the coronavirus. A school district statement says a complaint submitted to the governor’s office said hundreds of Mayfield High School students may have attended the unsanctioned prom held April 10. A school district spokeswoman says students who attended could face repercussions ranging from academic suspensions to being barred from attending school events such as graduation. The district said Mayfield would be on remote learning through April 26.  Read more

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Federal officials have reversed Trump administration restrictions on using human fetal tissue for medical research. The move clears the way for using government money on work that in the past has led to treatments for a variety of diseases, including COVID-19. The changes announced Friday allow government scientists to resume research that uses tissue from elective abortions. Scientists at universities also can now apply for federal grants without getting approval from a special ethics panel for any such work. The changes overturn rules imposed in June 2019.  Read more

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Prince Philip will be remembered as a man of “courage, fortitude and faith” at a martial but personal funeral on Saturday. The service will mark the death of a royal patriarch who was also a beloved husband and father, and one of a dwindling number of veterans of World War II. Hymns and music will reflect Philip’s military ties and wartime service in the Royal Navy, as well as his more than seven decades of support for his wife, Queen Elizabeth II. Philip died April 9 at the age of age 99 after 73 years of marriage. Coronavirus restrictions mean there will be only 30 mourners for the service, including the widowed queen, her four children and her eight grandchildren. Read more

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Keith Urban and Mickey Guyton will have a small audience at this year's Academy of Country Music Awards show on Sunday of vaccinated medical workers. The two hosts said there's no one more deserving of a special seat than the healthcare heroes during the COVID-19 pandemic. Guyton and Urban are co-hosting together for the first time, but they already have good chemistry. Guyton is the first Black woman to host the country music awards show and she said she wants to hold the door open for others in the country music community. Read more

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Louisiana is making a full-court press to get shots in arms, with sometimes creative outreach to make it as easy as possible to get vaccinated. The effort comes as vaccine supplies are surging but demand is not. The state has enlisted colleges, community groups and church pastors to cajole the hesitant and set up vaccination events. Democratic Gov. John Bel Edwards has thrown open vaccine access to anyone 16 or older. Civic and faith-based groups have started knocking on doors and making phone calls. Nearly 31% of the state’s population has received at least one dose, according to state data. But Louisiana is still near the bottom among states in vaccinating adults 18 and older. Read more

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The Biden administration says the U.S. is setting up a $1.7 billion national network to identify and track worrisome coronavirus mutations whose spread could trigger another pandemic wave. White House officials on Friday unveiled a strategy featuring three components: a major funding boost for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and state health departments to ramp up gene-mapping of coronavirus samples; the creation of six “centers of excellence” partnerships with universities to conduct research and develop technologies for gene-based surveillance of pathogens, and building a data system to better share and analyze information on emerging disease threats. The effort relies on money approved by Congress as part of President Joe Biden’s coronavirus relief package. Read more

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British actor Helen McCrory, who starred in the television show “Peaky Blinders” and the “Harry Potter” movies, has died. She was 52 and had been suffering from cancer. Her husband, fellow actor Damian Lewis, said Friday that McCrory died “peacefully at home” after a "heroic battle with cancer.” He tweeted: “She died as she lived. Fearlessly.” McCrory was one of Britain’s most respected actors, making her mark by playing a succession of formidable and sometimes fearsome women. She played the matriarch of a crime family on ”Peaky Blinders" and the scheming Narcissa Malfoy in the “Harry Potter” movies. Onstage, her roles included the vengeful Greek heroine “Medea” at the National Theatre in 2014. Read more

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La Soufriere volcano has shot out another explosive burst of gas and ash and a cruise ship has arrived to evacuate some of the foreigners who had been stuck on a St. Vincent island by a week of violent eruptions. The explosions that began on April 9 forced some 20,000 to flee the northern end of the eastern Caribbean island for shelters and contaminated water supplies across the island. A top volcanologist says Friday morning’s blast was "big enough to punch a hole through the clouds,” probaly reaching 8,000 meters (26,000 feet). Read more

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After a significant drop in mass shootings in the United States during a pandemic-hit 2020, this year has seen several deadly ones. Police in Indianapolis say eight people were shot and killed in a shooting late Thursday at a FedEx facility. It follows a lull in mass killings during the pandemic in 2020, according to a database compiled by The Associated Press, USA Today and Northeastern University. That database tracks mass killings defined as four or more dead, not including the shooter. Among the latest attacks were shootings at three Atlanta-area massage businesses and a one at a Boulder, Colorado, supermarket. Read more

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More than 111 million Americans voted before Election Day in 2020. But Republicans are moving to make it harder for that to happen again. The GOP’s campaign to place new restrictions on mail-in and early in-person voting will force millions of voters to contend with new rules limiting what are popular and proven methods of casting ballots. Though it is difficult to forecast how exactly the changes will affect future turnout, critics argue they target a voting method that has had growing appeal for both Democrats and Republicans. The GOP says the changes are needed to ensure there's no fraudulent voting, though last year's election came off without any of the widespread fraud alleged by former President Donald Trump. Read more

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West Point officials say most of the 73 West Point cadets accused in the biggest cheating scandal in decades at the U.S. Military Academy are being required to repeat a year and eight were expelled. The cadets were accused of cheating on an online calculus exam in May while cadets were studying remotely because of the coronavirus pandemic. Instructors had noticed irregularities in answers. All but one were freshmen in a class of 1,200. The academy also said it will end a 6-year-old “willful admission process" designed to protect cadets who promptly admit to wrongdoing from being kicked out.  Read more

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Robbie Williams and his wife Ayda Field have had their first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine in Los Angeles, just a few months after it was reported Robbie had contracted the virus. Read more

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A study of millions of Chileans who have received the Chinese-developed CoronaVac vaccine has found it 67% effective against symptoms and 80% against death from COVID-19. The South American country’s Health Ministry said Friday the study covered 10.5 million people, including 2.5 million who had received both doses of the vaccine and 1.5 million who had received a single dose between Feb. 2 and April 1. It counted cases starting 14 days after application of the second dose of the vaccine, which was given 28 days after the first. T vaccine reduced hospitalizations by 85%, intensive care visits by 89% and deaths by 80%. Read more

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The chief executive of Serum Institute of India, the world’s largest maker of vaccines and a critical supplier of the U.N.-backed COVAX facility, has asked President Joe Biden on Twitter to lift the U.S. embargo on exporting raw materials needed to make the the jabs. Vaccine makers and experts in India have been concerned that the use of the Defense Production Act by the U.S. to boost their own vaccine production was resulting in exports of critical raw materials being stopped. This was hobbling vaccine production in other parts of the world. Serum Institute of India has paused exports to COVAX after a devastating surge of infections in India resulted in increased domestic demand.  Read more

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Portugal is preparing to loosen virus restrictions as most of the Europe Union grapples with new COVID-19 cases and brings back curbs on what people can do. Starting Monday, the Portuguese will be able to go to restaurants, shopping malls and cinemas. Classes will resume at high schools and universities. In January, Portugal was the world's worst-hit country for the virus by size of population, but the pandemic has since ebbed significantly there. The head of the National Association of Public Health Doctors says Portugal is reaping the fruit of a lockdown that began in mid-January and “went on probably a bit longer than was strictly necessary.” Read more

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Prince Philip was known for occasional off-the-cuff remarks that could be embarrassing. But his faux pas at a White House dinner with President Richard Nixon in 1969 was enough for Philip to actually lose sleep. In a handwritten note to the president uncovered by archivists at the Richard M. Nixon Presidential Library and Museum, Philip lamented that he had failed to toast to Nixon’s health and success during a dinner in his honor, as protocol dictated. He wrote to Nixon that his "contribution was very lame” and that he had woken up that night ”in a cold sweat" about it. Philip died last week at 99. Read more

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South Africa took the first step in its mass vaccination campaign on Friday by starting online registrations for the elderly to receive shots beginning next month. People aged 60 years and older will be vaccinated first as they are regarded as having the highest risk of being hospitalized or dying from COVID-19. South Africa’s inoculation drive is dependent upon millions of doses of the Pfizer vaccine arriving in the country within weeks. So far South Africa has vaccinated only 290,000 of its 1.2 million health care workers, using the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. But earlier this week the government announced it would pause vaccinating its health workers following a report by the U.S FDA. Read more

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After Prince Philip’s death last week at age 99, politicians and world leaders rushed to eulogize his lifetime of service to his wife, Queen Elizabeth II, and to the British nation. But for many people across the country, his greatest contribution was the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award, a program he founded in 1956 to give young people skills and confidence. Participants must complete volunteer work, improve their physical fitness, learn new skills, and go on expeditions to earn each of three progressively more difficult levels of achievement. More than 6.7 million people between the ages of 14 and 24 have taken part in the U.K., and the program has expanded to 130 countries. Read more

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel has urged parliament to pass a bill that would mandate a nationwide “emergency brake” when the spread of the coronavirus becomes too rapid, saying that it is needed to prevent the country’s health care system from becoming overwhelmed. Merkel told lawmakers on Friday that it was necessary to take the situation seriously. The bill seeks to end the patchwork of measures that have characterized the pandemic response across Germany’s 16 states. Passing the bill is an uphill battle for Merkel, with state governments reluctant to cede any authority over health care to the federal government. Later in the day, Merkel said she had received her vaccination shot, a dose of the AstraZeneca product. Read more

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Ninety seconds. That’s how quickly Steven Soderbergh believes the Academy Awards will convince viewers that this year’s telecast is different. The concept for the show, which Soderbergh is producing with Stacey Sher and Jesse Collins, is to treat the telecast not like a TV show but a movie. And he’s convinced he’s got a doozy of an opening scene. Soderbergh promises the broadcast will “announce our intention immediately." The pandemic has shaken the Oscars like never before. There will be no audience. Some nominees will be connected remotely by satellite link. But for the producers, the challenges of COVID-19 are an opportunity to, finally, rethink the Oscars.   Read more

Reports are emerging of Brazilian health workers forced to intubate patients without the aid of sedatives, after weeks of warnings that hospitals and state governments are running out of critical medicines. One doctor in Rio de Janeiro told the Associated Press on Thursday that since its stock sedatives ran out, nurses and doctors have been using neuromuscular blockers and tying patients to their beds. The doctor says some patients try "to resist" and are "conscious.” Lack of required medicines is the latest pandemic problem to visit Brazil, which is experiencing a brutal COVID-19 outbreak that has flooded the nation’s intensive care units. Its daily death count is averaging at about 3,000, accounting for a quarter of deaths globally and making Brazil the epicenter of the pandemic. Read more

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Iran has finalized a deal with Russia to purchase 60 million doses of Sputnik V coronavirus vaccine. The state-run IRNA news agency reported Thursday that Iran’s ambassador to Russia, Kazem Jalali, said the contract for enough vaccines to inoculate 30 million people was "signed and finalized.” Jalali said Iran will receive the vaccines by the end of the year. Iran is in the midst of a 10-day lockdown as infections surge following a two-week public holiday for Nowruz, the Persian New Year. Meanwhile, its vaccine rollout has lagged, with some 200,000 doses administered in the country of 84 million people. Read more

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Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga has arrived in Washington for talks with President Joe Biden meant to show the strength of the two nations' security alliance. Friday's talks will come at a time when both nations are concerned with China’s growing economic and military clout. The talks will be Biden’s first face-to-face meeting with a foreign leader since he took office. They follow four years of uncertainty for the Japan-U.S. alliance under former President Donald Trump’s administration. Japan’s Foreign Ministry said Suga hopes to reaffirm the alliance’s “strong bond” and discuss a multinational effort to defend democratic values and counter China’s growing global influence and disputed territorial claims. Read more

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The nation’s next big voting battle is underway in Texas. Legislation advancing in the GOP-controlled Texas Capitol could outlaw 24-hour polling places, eliminate drive-thru voting and make it a crime for elections officials to mail unsolicited absentee ballot applications. Put another way, Republicans would ban everything Democratic Houston did to expand ballot access last year, when the threat of the coronavirus made voting in-person more hazardous. Republicans have angrily rejected accusations that they are trying to suppress minority turnout, saying the measures only rein in powers county leaders never had in the first place. Republican Gov. Greg Abbott supports the measures. Read more

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Divers searching the site of a capsized lift boat off Louisiana's coast have recovered two more unresponsive crewmembers. The Coast Guard declined to release more details, referring all questions late Friday to a local coroner. A Coast Guard statement said commercial divers on the capsized Seacor Power lift boat found the two Friday evening. Coast Guard Capt. Will Watson, commander of the New Orleans sector, said the agency extends its “deepest sympathy" to the family, friends and loved ones of all involved in what he called “this tragic incident.”  The vessel, which supports offshore oil rigs, overturned Tuesday in rough weather south of the Louisiana coast.  Read more

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President Joe Biden and Japan Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga are showcasing the alliance between their two countries as well as their shared resolve in dealing with China. The two met Friday at the White House in Biden's first face-to-face talks with a foreign leader as president. The talks featured unusually frank warnings from a Japanese leader against any effort by China to dominate the Indo-Pacific region by “force or coercion.” Suga and Biden were seeking to challenge messaging from Chinese President Xi Jinping that America and democracies in general are on the decline following the political turmoil and international withdrawal that marked Donald Trump’s presidency. Read more

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The coroner's office has released the names of the eight people who were fatally shot when a man opened fire at a FedEx plant in Indianapolis. Four of the victims of Thursday's shooting were from Indianapolis' Sikh community. The mass shooting marks another blow for the Asian American community in the United States. It comes a month after six people of Asian descent were killed in a mass shooting in the Atlanta area and amid ongoing attacks against Asian Americans during the coronavirus pandemic. The shooter has been identified as a 19-year-old former employee of FedEx. Police say he killed himself after shooting his victims.  Read more

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Viewers reacted with a mix of outrage and grief to newly released bodycam video that shows a Chicago police officer fatally shoot a 13-year-old less than a second after the boy dropped a handgun, turned toward the officer and began raising his hands. Amid renewed appeals for policing reform, some are calling for the officer who shot Adam Toledo to be charged or fired. But for others, the footage released Thursday shows how difficult such decisions might be for prosecutors and police higher-ups, with an officer making a split-second decision after chasing a suspect down a dark alley while responding to a report about gunshots. Read more

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Hard-right House Republicans are discussing forming an America First Caucus. One document obtained by The Associated Press describes its goals as championing “uniquely Anglo-Saxon political traditions.” It also warns that mass immigration is putting the “unique identity” of the U.S. at risk. The caucus document was first reported by Punchbowl News, a news outlet that covers Capitol Hill. The AP could not independently confirm the organization’s origins or current status, but Florida Rep. Matt Gaetz said he was joining and indicated that Georgia Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene was behind it.  Read more

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Newly released transcripts show that prosecutors overseeing a grand jury investigation into the death of Daniel Prude last year in Rochester, New York, undercut the case for criminal charges with testimony from a medical expert who said police officers who held Prude to the ground didn’t do anything wrong. The grand jury voted 15-5 not to charge the three officers involved in Prude's restraint. Prude stopped breathing as officers held him down with a hood over his face. New York Attorney General Letitia James had said in February, in announcing the grand jury’s decision, that the state had put on the best case it could. Read more

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Iran says it has begun enriching uranium to its highest-ever purity, edging close to weapons-grade levels. Tehran is attempting to pressure negotiators in Vienna during talks on restoring its nuclear deal with world powers after an attack on its main enrichment site. The move drew a rebuke from President Joe Biden, who noted that negotiations were continuing anyway. A top official said only a few grams an hour of uranium gas would be enriched up to 60% purity — triple its previous level but at a quantity far lower than what the Islamic Republic had been able to produce.  Read more

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San Diego Padres star shortstop Fernando Tatis Jr. was activated from the 10-day injured list in time for the opener of a highly anticipated series against the defending World Series champion Los Angeles Dodgers. Tatis had been out since suffering a partially dislocated left shoulder while taking a violent swing on April 6. Tatis was in the starting lineup and batting second for the Padres, whose first playoff run in 14 seasons ended when they were swept by the Dodgers in the NL Division Series in October.  Read more

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The mayor of a Minneapolis suburb that's seen nightly protests after a white police officer fatally shot Black motorist Daunte Wright contends police are overreacting to demonstrators and should scale back their tactics. Brooklyn Center Mayor Mike Elliott said at a news conference that he doesn't agree with police using pepper spray, tear gas and paintballs during demonstrations. The City Council passed a resolution banning city officers from using tear gas and other tactics against demonstrators. The city's stance has left leaders of other law enforcement agencies helping to control demonstrators confused. Hennepin County Sheriff David Hutchinson sent Elliott a letter Wednesday asking if he still wanted his department's help.  Read more

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 Firefighters struck a second alarm on a fire that burned multiple houses in Topton Friday night. Read more

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Los Angeles Dodgers manager Dave Roberts says center fielder Cody Bellinger has a hairline fracture in his left fibula. Roberts disclosed the news before the defending World Series champions opened a highly anticipated three-game series against the Padres. Roberts said Bellinger had a scan Thursday that showed the hairline fracture. The manager has no timetable for his return. Bellinger was injured when he was spiked on a close play at first base at Oakland on April 5. Read more

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Raul Castro says he is stepping down as head of Cuba’s Communist Party, ending an era of formal leadership by he and his brother Fidel Castro that began with the 1959 revolution. Castro made the announcement Friday in a speech at the opening of the Eighth congress of the ruling party, the only one allowed on the island. Castro didn’t say who he would endorse as his successor as first secretary of the Communist Party, but he previously has indicated that he favors yielding control to Miguel Díaz-Canel, who succeeded him as president in 2018. Read more

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JUNEAU, Alaska — Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy says COVID-19 vaccines would be made available at key airports in the state starting June 1. Read more

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A Hong Kong court has sentenced five leading pro-democracy advocates to up to 18 months in prison for organizing and participating in a massive march during the 2019 anti-government protests that triggered an overwhelming crackdown from Beijing. A total of nine advocates were given jail terms, but four of them had their sentences suspended after their age and accomplishments were taken into consideration. They were found guilty earlier this month of organizing a massive protest in August 2019, where an estimated 1.7 million people marched in opposition to a bill that would have allowed suspects to be extradited to China. It's another blow to the city’s flagging democracy movement, which is facing an unprecedented crackdown by Beijing and Hong Kong authorities.  Read more

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A top Chinese diplomat has called U.S. policy on China “too negative,” saying it highlights confrontation over cooperation. Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs Le Yucheng said Friday that cooperation could be critically important as President Joe Biden's administration focuses on COVID-19 and economic recovery. Le told The Associated Press in an interview that the two countries could tide over many difficulties by working together. He said the emphasis on competition and confrontation lacks a forward-looking spirit. But the vice minister added that cooperation needs to be on an equal basis and should not be “one side drawing up a laundry list of demands to the other side.” Read more

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A California woman has said in a jailhouse interview that she drowned her three young children to protect them from abuse by their father in the midst of a custody battle. Liliana Carrillo was interviewed Thursday by KGET-TV. Carrillo alleges that the father, Erik Denton, sexually abused the children and that she regrets killing them but felt it was the only way to keep them safe. Custody case court documents say Denton denied abusing the children and that the mother was delusional. The children were found dead Saturday. Carrillo hasn’t been charged in their deaths but was arrested and has pleaded not guilty to carjacking. Read more

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Uncertainty lingers over LSU athletics as the Tigers football program concludes spring practice. A logo in Tiger Stadium in recognition of Sexual Assault Awareness Month for this weekend’s spring game is among measures meant to promote healing on a campus that was found to have a culture hostile to women making allegations of sexual misconduct. The U.S. Department of Education and a state Senate select committee are reviewing how the university has handled sexual misconduct allegations. The school is also contending with a $50 million federal lawsuit. What the fallout will be remains unclear. But LSU will need time to restore its tarnished brand. Read more

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Jacob deGrom and the Mets hope to finally play some baseball. New York had four games in six days either postponed or suspended due to weather, including a snow out Friday night for the opener of their series at Colorado. The club has had seven postponements, including all three games of its opening series against Washington, which was called off due to the Nationals’ COVID-19 outbreak. Saturday’s forecast in Denver looks chilly but clear for a doubleheader. Also, the Cubs are growing frustrated as they lead the majors in hit by pitches for a second straight year. Read more

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President Joe Biden is calling for action as the nation struggles with yet another mass shooting and faces a reckoning over the deaths of Black men at the hands of police. But going beyond exhortations to Congress is proving difficult. Three months into his presidency, Biden’s robust agenda is running up against the realities of his narrow Democratic majority on Capitol Hill and the Senate’s limited ability to tackle multiple pieces of large-scale legislation at once. Issues like gun control and police reform appear likely to take a back seat. But Biden on Friday insisted that wasn’t the case, saying that on the issue of gun control in particular, “I’ve never not prioritized this." Read more

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President Joe Biden and celebrities including Billy Crystal and Lin-Manuel Miranda are part of a TV special aimed at boosting COVID-19 vaccination rates. The special, “Roll Up Your Sleeves,” airs at 7 p.m. Eastern Sunday on NBC. Biden will make a direct appeal in support of the vaccine effort, while former President Barack Obama will join with basketball greats Charles Barkley and Shaquille O’Neal to add their voices to the effort. The network said the hour-long program will include Matthew McConaughey interviewing Dr. Anthony Fauci to help separate “fact from fiction” about the vaccines. Also set to appear are Joe Jonas, Demi Lovato and Amanda Seyfried.  Read more

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The Justice Department has sued Donald Trump's ally Roger Stone, accusing the conservative provocateur and his wife of failing to pay nearly $2 million in income tax. The lawsuit was filed in federal court in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on Friday. It alleges the couple underpaid income tax by more than $1.5 million from 2007 until 2011 and separately alleges Stone also owes more than $400,000 for not fully paying his tax bill in 2018. Stone tells The Associated Press that the Internal Revenue Service is “well aware that I have no assets and that their lawsuit is politically motivated." Stone is a longtime friend of the former president's. Read more

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The modifications to parking and recreational activities will help resolve ongoing congestion issues and ultimately improve visitor safety and experiences, officials said. Read more

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Donovan Mitchell scored 22 points before leaving the game with a sprained ankle in the third quarter, and the NBA-leading Utah Jazz beat the Indiana Pacers 119-111. Bojan Bogdanovic had 24 points and Rudy Gobert added 13 points, 23 rebounds and four blocks for the Jazz. Utah won its second straight game. Mitchell went to the locker room after suffering a right ankle sprain with 8:18 left in the third quarter. He could not put any weight on his leg and had to be helped off the floor by teammates. Domantas Sabonis had 22 points, 15 rebounds, and seven assists for the Pacers. Read more

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NASA has chosen SpaceX to build the lunar lander that will eventually put the first woman and person of color on the moon. Friday's announcement came just a few hours after SpaceX's most international crew of astronauts yet arrived at Florida's Kennedy Space Center for a liftoff next week. The two Americans, one French and one Japanese are scheduled to blast off for the International Space Station next Thursday, which is Earth Day. This will be SpaceX's third launch of astronauts in less than a year.  Read more

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Draw the Lines PA is using a 1991 Volkswagen camper to urge people to make their voices heard during the process. Read more

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A judge has denied Ghislaine Maxwell's efforts to toss charges that she recruited three teenager girls from 1994 to 1997 for then-boyfriend Jeffrey Epstein to sexually abuse. U.S. District Judge Alison Nathan in Manhattan on Friday rejected arguments that a non-prosecution agreement Epstein reached with federal prosecutors over a dozen years ago protects Maxwell from prosecution. She also rejected arguments that some of all charges should be tossed out for a variety of reasons. The judge, however, did agree that Maxwell can be prosecuted separately on perjury charges. And she said arguments the defense will make against new sex trafficking charges will be decided later. Read more

"Families and members of the community can come out to their porches and their sidewalks to cheer them on." Read more

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A grim video of a Chicago police officer fatally shooting a 13-year-old boy puts a spotlight on the policies that govern foot chases. The video shows a 19-second chase that ended with the officer firing one bullet into the chest of Adam Toledo. It demonstrates the dangers of such pursuits and raises questions of what, if anything, can be done to prevent such deadly encounters. The Chicago Police Department does not have a formal foot pursuit policy but says it is drafting one. Mayor Lori Lightfoot demand a policy that would protect officers, suspects and bystanders. Read more

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Two-time champion Stewart Cink has set the 36-hole tournament scoring record at the RBC Heritage. Cink was at 16-under at Harbour Town, five shots ahead of Corey Conners and seven in front of a group of five including Collin Morikawa. Cink's 126 through two rounds was three shots better than the previous mark set by Jack Nicklaus in 1975 and Phil Mickelson in 2002. It's the 47-year-old Cink's lowest two-round score ever and his first lead halfway through a PGA Tour event since the Travelers Championship in 2008. He won in September in Napa, California — his first victory in 11 years. Read more

The release of body camera footage showing a Chicago police officer fatally shooting a 13-year-old was another test for news organizations. The March 29 shooting forced newsrooms to weigh how much graphic material they should show now that video of police confrontations is becoming commonplace. One Chicago digital site offered subscribers a choice to read the story with or without the video. National television outlets took similar approaches. They showed jumpy body camera footage of officer Eric Stillman chasing Adam Toledo and ordering him to drop a gun, followed by Toledo’s empty hands being raised. The video is stopped at the moment of the fatal shot. Read more