Pennsylvania nursing home

In this Nov. 6, 2015 file photo, an elderly couple walks down a hall of a nursing home in Easton, Pa.

HARRISBURG, Pa. -- The Department of health has released information Saturday regarding inspections and procedures they have conducted since February at nursing homes in the state. 

According to the statement, since the beginning of February, the Pa.  Department of Health nursing home surveyors conducted 1,473 inspections of nursing homes, including 907 complaint investigations during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

In addition, 10 sanctions were finalized against nursing care facilities, which included the issuance of two provisional one licenses, and civil penalties totaling $93,500.

“We know that congregate care settings, like nursing homes, have been challenged by the COVID-19 pandemic,” Secertary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine said. “That is why we remain committed to protecting the health and well-being of our most vulnerable Pennsylvanians by continuing to hold nursing home operators accountable, as necessary, to ensure they are providing safe care. If you see something at a nursing home that doesn’t seem right, we encourage you to speak up.” 

The following breakdowns represent survey activity that occurred each month:

  • April
    • 486 surveys of 336 separate facilities
    • 113 building safety surveys
    • 373 patient care surveys
    • 298 complaint investigations
  • March
    • 537 surveys of 359 separate facilities
    • 150 building safety surveys
    • 387 patient care surveys
    • 321 complaint investigations
  • February
    • 450 surveys of 314 separate facilities
    • 119 building safety surveys
    • 331 patient care surveys
    • 288 complaint investigations

State officials say, although annual inspections are not occurring at this time, extensions are in place according to guidance issued from the Center of Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS).

The majority of other inspections are still occurring, but may be conducted virtually rather than onsite to minimize the spread of COVID-19. 

Individuals with complaints about a nursing home can file that complaint with the department in several ways. Complaints can be made anonymously by calling 1-800-254-5164, filling out the online complaint form, emailing          c-ncomplai@pa.gov or sending the complaint in the mail to the department.

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