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It’s easy to see what we’ve inherited from our family, like mom’s smile or dad’s blue eyes, but when it comes to certain health conditions like stomach cancer, genetics may play a critically important role for generations.

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If you’ve been to the doctor’s office, you know about the paperwork you have to fill out before you see the physician, especially the questions about your family history. But there is one condition that doctors don’t ask about, and it's a question that could save your life, and the lives of your family members.

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If you take dietary or herbal supplements, beware. Cardiologists are reporting a recent surge in heart problems in people in their twenties and thirties. This adds to the concern that some heart doctors have voiced for years about other supplements, including calcium.

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Two out of three nurses in the US say they are considering leaving the profession. This comes as the Bureau of Labor and Statistics reports we will need 200-thousand more nurses in the next ten years.

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For those who made a resolution to get more exercise in this new year, getting in your daily 10,000 steps sounds like a good place to start. New research shows that it’s not only the quantity of steps, but the quality that matters.

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Much like cigarette smoking, vaping may become a habit that is tough to quit. Researchers are now conducting a clinical trial of a plant-based product that has been tested on cigarette smokers to see if it helps people hooked on vaping.

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Early intervention can make a difference when it comes to treatment and outcomes.

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What’s holding Americans back when it comes to getting active? It could be what you don’t know.

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There are more than 55 million people around the world living with dementia and 10 million more new cases are diagnosed every year. Studies show regular exercise and what you eat can affect your dementia risk, but what about other lesser-known factors? 

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BOSTON, Ma. - It might not be visible to the untrained eye, but your ophthalmologist might uncover a spot or freckle that could be a sign of ocular melanoma, or cancer of the eye.

Hong Kong’s top court has ruled that full sex reassignment surgery should not be a prerequisite for transgender people to have their gender changed on their official identity cards. The decision is likely to have a far-reaching impact on the transgender community. Two transgender men appealed to the court last month over the government’s refusal to change the genders on their ID cards because of their decision not to have full sex reassignment surgeries. The court ruled that the government's policy was “disproportionate” in its encroachment on the rights of the two and was unconstitutional.

Hong Kong’s top court has ruled that full sex reassignment surgery should not be a prerequisite for transgender people to have their gender changed on their official identity cards. The decision is likely to have a far-reaching impact on the transgender community. Two transgender men appealed to the court last month over the government’s refusal to change the genders on their ID cards because of their decision not to have full sex reassignment surgeries. The court ruled that the government's policy was “disproportionate” in its encroachment on the rights of the two and was unconstitutional.

Officials say a polar bear that killed a young mother and her baby Jan. 17 in western Alaska was likely an older animal in poor physical condition. However tests have come back negative for pathogens that affect the brain and cause aggressive behavior. A state wildlife veterinarian collected and examined samples from the bear’s head a day after it was killed. The results of analysis indicate it was an adult male and in poor health. Standard tests conducted on tissues are negative for rabies, toxoplasmosis, distemper and avian influenza. State and federal wildlife officials say there is no definitive explanation as to why the bear was in poor condition.

New York City is ending its COVID-19 vaccination mandate for municipal employees including police officers, firefighters and teachers. Mayor Eric Adams says the vaccine mandate will end Friday. Adams said Monday that with more than 96% of city employees and more than 80% of city residents having received their initial vaccine shots, this is the right moment for this decision. The vaccination mandate for city employees was one of the last pandemic measures still in place in New York City. The city ended its vaccine requirement for employees of private businesses last November.

New York City is ending its COVID-19 vaccination mandate for municipal employees including police officers, firefighters and teachers. Mayor Eric Adams says the vaccine mandate will end Friday. Adams said Monday that with more than 96% of city employees and more than 80% of city residents having received their initial vaccine shots, this is the right moment for this decision. The vaccination mandate for city employees was one of the last pandemic measures still in place in New York City. The city ended its vaccine requirement for employees of private businesses last November.