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The tiniest of tiny preemies, weighing in at three, two, even one pound, are being born, surviving and thriving. The youngest baby to survive was born at just 21 weeks. Baby James is now in his mid-20s and perfectly healthy. Any baby born before 37 weeks is considered premature. Right now, there's no telling which moms will deliver early and which ones will go the full 40 weeks, but soon, a simple blood test may be able to pinpoint a due date and save little lives.

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They are called blade runners, elite athletes who are among the fastest in the world, running with only one or, even, no legs, and they are among the first to break records with a new generation of prosthetics.

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Babies born with heart defects before the 1980s often did not make it to adulthood, and those who did faced a difficult surgery, and sometimes a lifetime of restrictions and uncertainty, but new procedures at the hands of the country's top pediatric surgeons are making a huge difference.

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Oncologists at Phoenix Children's Hospital said nausea and vomiting disturbs families most when their children are getting chemotherapy. After one particularly distressing instance, a doctor reached out to the technology department, teaming up to get the right anti-nausea drugs to kids.

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About six million Americans have heart failure, a condition that happens when the heart muscle doesn't pump blood as well as it should. It often affects older adults with aging hearts, but now, a study shows heart failure is on the rise in younger people, too, and more are dying from it.

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Young boys in America are diagnosed with autism four times more often than girls, and researchers want to figure out why. It turns out girls use different kinds of words to retell a story than do boys -- words like "I think" and "I feel," and that very language separator may mask autism in girls.

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A first-of-its kind intensive outpatient program is changing the way trauma survivors are treated. The University of Central Florida RESTORES is combining therapy and technology to give those who have survived trauma their lives back.

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Lymphatic systems help clear the body of extra fluids and infection, but when they don't work properly, deadly excess fluid is retained in the body. That was the case with a young boy whose family sought help at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. By testing various medications using tiny fish, doctors miraculously saved his life.

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Results from several clinical trials combining chemotherapy and immunotherapy changed the standard of care for many lung cancer patients last year. The chemo kills the cancer cells, and the drug prompts the immune system to do its job.

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — Authorities say air pollution in the Bosnian capital of Sarajevo has reached dangerous levels in recent days, prompting officials to ban freight vehicles from the roads, cancel all outdoor public events and warn citizens to remain indoors.

PAGO PAGO, American Samoa (AP) — The government of American Samoa declared that the U.S. territory has an outbreak of measles, a move that will lead to the closure of public schools starting Monday and a ban on gatherings in parks.

SAN DIEGO (AP) — A flesh-eating bacteria linked to the use of black tar heroin has killed at least seven people over the past two months in the San Diego area, prompting health authorities to alert law enforcement and other officials in California.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Trappers can keep using sodium cyanide bombs to kill coyotes and other livestock predators, the Trump administration said Thursday, rejecting calls for a ban despite repeated instances of the devices also poisoning other wildlife, pets and people.

LONDON (AP) — The vaccine alliance GAVI announced Thursday it would invest $178 million to create a global stockpile of about 500,000 Ebola vaccines, a decision that health officials say could help prevent future outbreaks from spiraling out of control.