• Updated

At least 2.7 million Americans are living with atrial fibrillation, or AFib. It's an irregular heartbeat or a "quivering" heart that, left untreated, could lead to blood clots, stroke, or heart failure. Medication is the gold standard treatment, but a new study may lead to a change for doctors and patients.

  • Updated

Congenital pulmonary airway malformation, also called C-PAM, is a rare birth defect that only occurs in up to one in every 35,000 births, causing a mass to form on the lung of a fetus. The condition can also be accompanied by hydrops, where fluid builds up in a baby's tissue, causing extreme swelling as well as excess fluid inside the placenta. And in cases of C-PAM with hydrops, 95% of babies die before or soon after birth.

  • Updated

More than 661,000 Americans have kidney failure; of these, 468,000 are on dialysis, a lifesaving, but time-consuming procedure that removes waste and excess water from the body. For many, it means repeated trips to a special dialysis center and hours hooked to the dialysis machine. A newly FDA-approved home system is helping patients do dialysis themselves.

  • Updated

For months, research has shown how the COVID-19 virus affects the brain, causing infected patients to experience memory loss, difficulty sleeping, and problems focusing, but now, patients who have never had COVID are experiencing the same symptoms.

  • Updated

About 6.2 million children in the U.S. are living with asthma. This chronic disease can severely limit daily activities and impact quality of life. Now, scientists are uncovering clues that could protect kids against this condition.

  • Updated

Peritoneal cancer is cancer that develops in the thin layer of tissue that covers the abdomen on surfaces of organs, like the appendix, stomach, or intestines. Meet one man who said he owes his survival not only to his surgeon, but in a rare coincidence, a colleague who knew exactly what to look for.

  • Updated

More than five million Americans are currently living with Alzheimer's disease, and despite ongoing research, no new approved drug for Alzheimer's has been approved since 2003. Now, a new drug that is showing mixed results in trials is still giving Alzheimer's patients a lot of hope.

  • Updated

In the next year, more than 32,000 Americans will be diagnosed with multiple myeloma, a cancer of the body's white blood cells called plasma cells. Almost 13,000 will die from the disease. Now, researchers are testing a type of immunotherapy that unleashes cells into the body designed to destroy the cancer.

  • Updated

More than 34 million Americans are dealing with diabetes. Over time, high blood sugar will cause nerve damage in their feet, and without care, ulcers could form and never heal. More than 80% of amputations begin as foot ulcers, but with simple daily changes, this is preventable.

  • Updated

Prenatal vitamins are essential for pregnant women. Studies show more than 120,000 babies will be born with birth defects in the United States this year. Up to seven in 10 could be prevented if expectant mothers took a prenatal vitamin, according to the March of Dimes. Folic acid, iron, calcium, vitamin D are all essential for your unborn baby, and now, another nutrient is being added to the list to not only help the babies' brain development, but also protect them from COVID-19.

Former Italian Premier Matteo Renzi is testing his already low popularity by provoking a political crisis that could bring down the government at yet another critical juncture in the fight against the pandemic. Renzi orchestrated the resignations of two ministers from his tiny but key Italia Viva party. The outcome of his power play will become clearer this week, when Premier Giuseppe Conte addresses both houses of Parliament. If Conte makes a successful bid for support, he could go on to form what would be his third coalition government since 2018. This isn't Renzi’s first foray as an iconoclast in Italian politics. He became Italy's leader in 2014 by unceremoniously deposing his party's premier.

The U.K. government says it plans to offer a first dose of COVID-19 vaccine to every adult by September as the nation’s health service battles the worst crisis in its 72-year-history. Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said Sunday that the government is continuing to open new vaccination sites and will soon begin trialing round the clock injections at some locations to help increase the pace of delivery. He told Sky that while the target is September “If we can do it faster than that, great, but that’s the roadmap.” The ambitious vaccination program comes amid crushing pressures on the National Health Service.

The Austrian government says it is extending the country’s lockdown until Feb. 7 in a drive to push down still-high infection figures as officials worry about the possible impact of new coronavirus variants. Chancellor Sebastian Kurz said Sunday that some measures will also be tightened as a result of the more infectious variants that were first detected in Britain and South Africa. He said people will now be asked to stay 2 meters ( 6 1/2 feet) apart instead of 1 meter. Beginning Jan. 25, they will also be required to wear full protective masks on public transport and in shops, rather than just fabric face coverings. Restaurants and hotel may have to stay closed all February.

Across the Balkans and other nations in southeastern Europe, a vaccination campaign against the coronavirus is being overshadowed by heated political debates or conspiracy theories that threaten to thwart the process. In countries like the Czech Republic, Serbia, Bosnia, Romania and Bulgaria, vaccine skeptics have ranged from former presidents to top athletes and doctors. Nations that once routinely went through mass inoculations under Communist leaders are deeply split over whether to take the vaccines at all. There's also a split in Serbia over which vaccine to take: the Western-made Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, Russia’s Sputnik V or China's Sinopharm. It's yet another source of division in a country where many favor closer ties with Moscow.

A city government in eastern China says the coronavirus was found on ice cream produced there, prompting a recall of cartons from the same batch. The government says employees of the company in Tianjin, adjacent to Beijing, are being tested for the coronavirus. There is no indication anyone has contracted the virus from the ice cream. Most of the 29,000 cartons of ice cream in the batch had yet to be sold. The government says 390 sold in Tianjin are being tracked down and authorities elsewhere were notified of sales to their areas. China has suggested the disease, first detected in Wuhan, came from abroad and has highlighted what it says are discoveries of the virus on imported fish and other food. 

A California congressman contracted the coronavirus before he could get a second dose of vaccine that would have improved his immunity. Democratic Rep. Lou Correa announced Saturday he tested positive upon returning home from Washington, D.C., prompting him to self-quarantine away from his family. His office said he received the first dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine on Dec. 19 and has not received the second shot that would have boosted his immunity to about 95%. Correa is the latest House member to report testing positive since dozens of lawmakers huddled together for protection during the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol

A Mississippi owner of pharmacies and pharmacy distributors has been sentenced to 18 years in prison and ordered to repay more than $287 million for his part in what prosecutors described as a $510 million health care fraud. The U.S. Attorney's Office for southern Mississippi says 54-year-old Wade Ashley Walters of Hattiesburg also was ordered to forfeit more than $56 million that he personally gained from the scheme involving high-priced pain cream. Walters had pleaded guilty in July to one count each of conspiracy to commit health care fraud and conspiracy to commit money laundering. His sentencing was held Friday.  

Several governors expressed exasperation at the Trump administration after being assured that the federal government had enough vaccine stockpiled to speed up or expand state rollouts only to be later told those reserves don’t exist. Meanwhile, organizers of the Boston Marathon aren’t letting the indefinite postponement of the race keep them from trying to keep runners from staying connected. The Boston Athletic Association launched a virtual Athletes’ Village in the hopes that runners will use it as a digital hub to share training tips, seek out coaching and compete in monthly challenges. New COVID-19 fatalities pushed the U.S. death toll to 392,537 on Friday, virtually assuring it will reach 400,000 by the time President-elect Joe Biden is inaugurated Wednesday.