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Today is Tuesday, Oct. 20, the 294th day of 2020. There are 72 days left in the year. Read more

Glenn Close will receive an honorary AARP award for her work with a charity that brings awareness to mental illness. AARP announced Tuesday that Close will be the first to receive its honorary Purpose Prize Award during a virtual ceremony on Dec. 3. The Oscar-winning actress will be recognized for her work with Bring Change to Mind, an organization that strives to end the stigma and discrimination surrounding mental illness. AARP will award the Purpose Prize to five individuals. Each prize winner will receive a $50,000 award for their organization. AARP said 10 Purpose Prize fellows will also be honored. Read more

The Justice Department has announced charges against Russian intelligence officers in cyberattacks that targeted a French presidential election, the Winter Olympics in South Korea and American businesses. The case implicates the Kremlin unit that interfered in the 2016 U.S. election but is not related to the November vote. The six defendants are said to be current and former officers in the Russian military intelligence agency known as the GRU. The indictment accuses the six of hacks prosecutors say were aimed at furthering the Kremlin’s geopolitical interests and in destabilizing or punishing perceived enemies. A Kremlin spokesman on Tuesday rejected the accusations and said they resemble “regularly occurring relapses of rampant Russophobia.” Read more

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U.S. home construction rose a solid 1.9% in September after having fallen in August as home building remains one of the bright spots for the economy. The Commerce Department reported Tuesday that the September increased pushed home construction to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.42 million homes and apartments after a 6.7% drop in August. Applications for building permits, a good sign of future activity, rose an even stronger 5.2% to 1.55 million units. Read more

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The Justice Department is expected to file a lawsuit Tuesday alleging that Google has been abusing its online dominance in online search to stifle competition and harm consumers. The litigation marks the government’s most significant act to protect competition since its groundbreaking case against Microsoft more than 20 years ago. The suit could be an opening salvo ahead of other major government antitrust actions, given ongoing investigations of major tech companies including Apple, Amazon and Facebook at both the Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission. Google has long denied the claims of unfair competition. Google argues that although its businesses are large, they are useful and beneficial to consumers. Read more

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A memorial march will be held near Paris in homage to the history teacher who was beheaded last week, while French police said 16 people remain in custody as part of the investigation into the attack. Local elected officials, teachers and parent’s associations called on people to dress in white for the march Tuesday evening in Conflans-Sainte-Honorine, northwest of Paris. It will take place near the high school where Samuel Paty was teaching. Paty was beheaded Friday by an 18-year-old Moscow-born Chechen refugee, who was later shot dead by police. Police officials said Paty had discussed caricatures of Islam’s Prophet Muhammad with his class, leading to threats. Read more

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Italian prosecutors and the government’s privacy watchdog are investigating how the names of women who miscarried or had abortions ended up on crosses over graves for the fetuses in a Rome cemetery. Rights groups have denounced the grave markings as a gross violation of the women’s privacy. Regulations require burial of a fetus after 20 weeks, but women who have complained said they never knowingly consented to the burials. The scandal has reverberated in this largely Roman Catholic country at a time when women say finding a doctor to perform an abortion has become increasingly difficult. A women’s rights group says it has identified over 1,000 such graves and filed a formal complaint with prosecutors.   Read more

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A new poll finds Americans' trust in the people and institutions giving them information about the coronavirus has fallen across the board. The poll by USAFacts and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research on where America gets its COVID-19 facts shows trust of many people and groups is down significantly from what it was in April. Nearly two-thirds of Americans say they don't trust President Donald Trump much or at all for accurate coronavirus information. The poll shows only social media has higher distrust levels. The poll also shows a large chunk of Americans find it hard to know if COVID-19 information is accurate. Read more

Finland’s national carrier says it will cut 700 jobs - or over 10% of its workforce - by the end of March next year due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on global travel. Finnair is heavily focused on flights from Europe to Asia. It said Tuesday that some 600 of the redundancies would be in Finland and another 100 outside the Nordic country. The coronavirus pandemic has forced almost all global airlines to halt most of their flights. Finnair has already temporarily laid off a large part of its 6,500 staff and its flight traffic was down 91% in September from the previous year.  Read more

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A state-owned Chinese drugmaker says it is setting up production lines to supply 1 billion doses of two possible coronavirus vaccines that are being tested on 50,000 people in 10 countries. The chairman of SinoPharm Group said Tuesday that testing is “in the last kilometer of a long march." Liu Jingzhen gave no indication when results are expected. China’s fledgling drug industry is part of a global race to produce a vaccine and has four candidates in final stages of testing. Health experts say, however, that even if China succeeds, stringent certification rules in the United States, Europe and Japan might mean its vaccine can be distributed only in other developing countries. Read more

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The European Commission has launched infringements procedures against Cyprus and Malta over their “golden passport” programs, in which wealthy people can acquire EU citizenship in exchange for an investment. The EU’s executive said Tuesday that the lucrative program goes against the bloc’s treaties and undermines the “essence of EU citizenship.” Cyprus recently announced it was ending its program amid allegations that a top state official and a veteran lawmaker were trying to bypass strict vetting rules. The EU Commission notes that Cyprus will continue to process current applications despite its intention to end the scheme from November.   Read more

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An official in eastern Congo says more than 1,300 inmates have escaped from the central prison in Beni after an attack by rebels of the Allied Democratic Forces. Mayor Modeste Bakwanamaha told The Associated Press that one inmate had died during the attack. The mayor said that 20 of the escaped prisoners had already returned, preferring incarceration to life with the rebels. The Allied Democratic Forces rebel group, known as the ADF, originated in Uganda and has long been a threat in eastern Congo. News of the Kangbayi jailbreak angered locals, who feared the mass escape could further exacerbate violence in the area. Read more

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NATO plans to create a new space center to help manage satellite communications and the alliance’s military operations. The move is part of NATO's efforts to keep ahead in a fast moving and hi-tech sector. There is particular concern about what member countries say is increasingly aggressive behavior by China and Russia. In December, NATO leaders declared space to be the alliance’s “fifth domain” of operations, after land, sea, air and cyberspace. Over two days of talks starting Thursday, NATO defense ministers will greenlight a new space center at the alliance’s Air Command in Ramstein, Germany. Read more

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Overnight lows also won't be nearly as chilly as our past weekend nights, with temps only dropping into the 50s Read more

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The Department of Justice is using aggressive tactics against those it has charged in the civil unrest over racism. Those people have been portrayed by President Donald Trump as violent left-wing radicals. The Republican president has used the protests to try to scare white, suburban voters into reelecting him. But an Associated Press review of thousands of pages of court documents from the more than 300 federal arrests made nationwide shows many are people caught up in the moment. Very few of those charged appear to be affiliated with any highly organized extremist groups. Many are young suburban adults with little criminal history, from the very neighborhoods Trump vows to protect. Read more

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Police say a 51-year-old man in the home threatened to shoot his wife and himself after an argument. Read more

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Poland’s constitutional court has been asked to issue a ruling expected to determine the fate of one of the last state bodies that has kept its independence from the populist right-wing government. The Constitutional Tribunal was due to issue a ruling Tuesday that could pave the way for the ruling party to control that the office of the Human Rights Commissioner. The ruling had to be postponed due to a judge's illness. Since the party, Law and Justice, won power in 2015, it has taken control of almost all state institutions. However, the Human Rights Commissioner, a top civil servant whose role is to defend individuals facing threats to their civil rights, has acted with independence.  Read more

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Chase Briscoe has earned the promotion he's been chasing all year. Briscoe next season will follow the path of fellow Indiana native Tony Stewart and drive the No. 14 in the Cup Series for Stewart-Haas Racing. Briscoe earned the bump with nine wins this season and a spot in next month's Xfinity Series title-deciding finale. Briscoe will be largely backed by sponsor Highpoint, a technology solutions company that has built a personal relationship with Briscoe. Highpoint came through with the late funding for Briscoe's Xfinity ride this season and is supporting the move to Cup.  Read more

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Some teenage girls in Nairobi have turned to sex work to help feed their families. They cannot remember how many men they have had to sleep with since their schools closed this year. The United Nations says the COVID-19 pandemic risks significantly reducing gains made in the fight against child labor. The world could see the first rise in the number of working children since 2000. The U.N. warns that millions of children are at risk of being forced into exploitative and hazardous jobs, and school closures could exacerbate the problem. Sub-Saharan Africa already had the highest rates of children out of school. Read more

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Thailand’s Cabinet has approved a request to recall Parliament for a special session to deal with the political pressures from ongoing anti-government protests. The Cabinet approved the request at its weekly meeting Tuesday and the non-voting session will be held Oct. 26-27. There is a deadlock between the government and the student-led protesters, who want Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha to step down, the constitution to be amended to make it more democratic, and reforms to the monarchy to have it conform to democratic norms. The government has sought to weaken the protesters’ resolve over the past week by arresting their leaders, declaring a state of emergency for Bangkok that makes all rallies illegal, and trying to impede their gatherings. Read more

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Stocks are opening higher on Wall Street as traders look over several solid earnings reports from U.S. companies. They're also monitoring last-ditch efforts in Washington to get more aid for the economy. The S&P 500 rose 0.4% in the first few minutes of trading Tuesday. Procter & Gamble, Regions Financial and Travelers all rose after reporting quarterly results that were better than analysts were expecting. The Justice Department is expected to file a lawsuit later in the day claiming that Google has abused its dominance in search to stifle competition. Overseas markets were mixed and Treasury yields held steady.   Read more

A survey shows Jack Ma, founder of e-commerce giant Alibaba, held onto his status as China’s richest entrepreneur as the coronavirus shutdown propelled demand for online shopping and other services. Hurun Research Institute, which follows the country’s wealthy, said Ma’s fortune rose 45% percent over 2019 to $58.8 billion. Ma Huateng, founder of Tencent, which operates the popular WeChat messaging service, was No. 2 at $57.4 billion, up 50%. This year, the coronavirus boosted the fortunes of Alibaba’s Ma and other internet entrepreneurs as the shutdown of the Chinese economy to fight the virus propelled demand for online shopping and business tools. Read more

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LONDON — London’s Heathrow Airport has launched a rapid coronavirus test service for passengers. Read more

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is reporting some progress in advance of a Tuesday deadline for reaching a pre-election deal with President Donald Trump on a new coronavirus relief package, but the same problems bedeviling the effort remain in place despite optimistic talk from the president and his team. Pelosi negotiated for nearly an hour Monday with Trump’s top emissary, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, and a top aide called it productive. But with time nearly up for Congress and the White House to deliver aid to Americans before the election, the question remains: If not now, when?  Read more

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President Donald Trump has come out swinging against Dr. Anthony Fauci and polls that show Trump trailing Democrat Joe Biden in key battleground states. The Republican president is trying to buck up his team two weeks out from Election Day as he campaigns in the West. Trump is dismissing the cautionary coronavirus advice of his scientific experts and polls showing Biden ahead of him. Trump is back on the trail after his own coronavirus hospitalization. On Monday he blasted government scientists for their criticism of his handling of the pandemic and called Fauci “a disaster.” Fauci tells CBS he's not surprised Trump contracted the virus after holding large events with few face coverings. Read more

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President Donald Trump’s sprawling political operation raised well over $1 billion since he took the White House in 2017 — and set a lot of it on fire. Now, with two weeks until the election, his campaign acknowledges it is facing difficult spending decisions at a time when Democratic nominee Joe Biden has flooded the airwaves with advertising. That has put Trump in the position of needing to do more of his signature rallies during the coronavirus pandemic while relying on an unproven theory that he can turn out infrequent voters who nonetheless support him at historic levels. Read more

Republican U.S. Sen. Dan Sullivan is on the defensive in Alaska, a state that has long been a GOP stronghold. He is facing Al Gross, a Democratic-backed independent whose career as a doctor and tale of killing a bear are central to his campaign as he and Sullivan fight over who best represents Alaskans. Across the country, Republicans are defending seats they once thought safe as Democrats seeking to defeat President Donald Trump pump money into races as they also work to reclaim control of the Senate. Gross says he would caucus with Democrats but has resisted Sullivan’s efforts to paint him as liberal. Read more

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Argentina has reached a grim milestone in the pandemic, becoming the fifth country in the world to surpass 1 million coronavirus cases. Across Latin America, three other nations are expected to reach 1 million cases in the coming weeks — Colombia, Mexico and Peru. The somber point comes as Latin America continues to register some of the world’s highest daily case counts. And though some nations have seen important declines, overall there has been little relief, with cases dropping in one municipality only to escalate in another. The trajectory is showing that the pandemic is likely to leave no corner of Latin America unscathed.   Read more

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The Philippine president has said he accepts responsibility for the thousands of killings committed during police operations in his crackdown on drugs, adding that he was even ready to go to jail. President Rodrigo Duterte’s televised remarks Monday night were typical of his bluster — and tempered by the fact that he has pulled his country out of the International Criminal Court. An ICC prosecutor is examining complaints against Duterte. The remarks were a clear acknowledgement that Duterte could face a deluge of criminal charges. Nearly 6,000 killings of drug suspects have been reported by police since the leader took office in mid-2016, but rights watchdogs suspect the death toll is far larger.  Read more

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Intel has agreed to a $9 billion deal to sell most of its memory business to South Korea’s SK Hynix as it moves toward more diverse technologies while shedding a Chinese factory at a time of trade friction between Washington and Beijing. The transaction could reportedly make SK Hynix the world’s second-largest provider of NAND flash memory chips behind Samsung Electronics, another South Korean chip giant. Intel will keep its “Optane” business of more advanced memory products, which analysts say are mostly produced in the United States. Demand for flash memory has surged due to strong purchases of personal computers and servers as the coronavirus pandemic forces millions to work from home.  Read more