Local News

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Stretches of Bethlehem's Center and Linden streets were converted into one-way routes long ago to help workers get to and from Bethlehem Steel. The "last cast" of steel was poured in 1995, but the one-way streets remain. Read more

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Changing intersections so signals could be added would would cost $230,000 to $250,000 each, or as much as $1 million total. Read more

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Lane Johnson said he plans to return to the Eagles, after being noticeably missing from Philadelphia's roster for a couple weeks due to what the team called "personal reasons." Read more

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Laser MD Medspa has acquired Young Medical Spa, adding four Pennsylvania locations, including Young's Upper Saucon Township office. Read more

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Five veterans were honored in Schuylkill County in a special way. Read more

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The car community is rallying behind a Northampton County man with terminal illness. Read more

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Monday will likely start off rather sunny, but then turn cloudy during the afternoon, and a brisk breeze will add an extra chill to the air. Read more

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A man is dead and a woman seriously hurt in what authorities are calling an attempted murder-suicide in Northampton County. Read more

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The mall was evacuated after shots were fired, but no major injuries were immediately reported. Read more

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Fall-themed floats, fire trucks, classic cars, and folks who were dressed up in their favorite costumes took over Main Street. Read more

The event raises money to help families with children who have severe disabilities and rare genetic disorders. Read more

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The bikers put down their kickstands and let the kids check out their Harleys. Read more

Monday is the deadline to submit your registration application if you plan to vote in the November 2nd election. Read more

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Court records identify the man as 44-year-old Brian Kunsman. Read more

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Brisk winds and cool temperatures will remain for start of the work week.  Read more

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Officials say the driver of a vehicle was traveling south on Gravel Pike and attempted to curve right in the roadway, entered the northbound lane and hit a second vehicle.  Read more

The Vietnam Traveling Memorial Wall is on display at Califon Island Park on Bank Street in Califon. Read more

The 2021 Red Corner Benefit was dedicated to 2-year-old Ellie Makarevitz.  Read more

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Officials say they found the19-year-old deceased, with gunshot wounds, in a wooded area next to the roadway.  Read more

Officials say the driver of the vehicle was traveling east on Deturksville Road when he hit a man crossing the roadway.  Read more

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Noticeably cooler on Sunday. A spotty shower is possible in the afternoon. Read more

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Authorities have yet to release the names of the woman killed or the man suspected of shooting her. Read more

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Troopers say the female operator lied about her identity and gave police numerous alias names.  Read more

The parades on Saturday included local school bands, fire trucks and people of all ages dressed in creative costumes.  Read more

The festival organization is hosting the Fall Fest on Main, featuring smaller, in-person events. Read more

Matey's Famous Steaks and Pizza in Fountain Hill is serving up its last dishes Saturday after serving the community in Lehigh County for 33 years. Read more

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US and World News

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A judge says Cuba Gooding Jr. will go on trial in February in his New York City groping case. Prosecutors are expected to portray the actor as a serial offender and the defense to contend the case is an example of Me Too run amok. A judge on Monday set a Feb. 1 trial date in the case. It involves allegations the Oscar-winning “Jerry Maguire” star violated three different women at three different Manhattan night spots in 2018 and 2019. The judge had expressed a desire to start the trial sooner, possibly in December. But a lawyer for Gooding says he’ll be tied up with other trials. Read more

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The NBA, known today as a leader when it comes to culture and racial issues, was anything but during the 1950s when segregation divided the country. It was a powerless, fledgling league trying to find its footings. Franchises were folding and few paid much attention to the NBA. When Jackie Robinson became Major League Baseball’s first Black player in 1947, Bob Cousy remembered it being major national news. Three years later, his Boston Celtics made Chuck Cooper the NBA’s first Black draft pick. The 93-year-old Cousy says “to this day I have yet to read a story about Chuck Cooper breaking the color line in the NBA, because as I say nobody gave a damn what color we were or what we were doing." Read more

Norwegian police say the Danish man suspected of killing five people and injuring three in an attack in the southern town of Kongsberg last week may have used “stabbing weapons” in the massacre along with a bow and arrow. Police inspector Per Thomas Omholt said Monday that it was possible that the 37-year-old suspect, identified as Espen Andersen Braathen, used first the bow-and-arrow to wound his victims in Wednesday's attack and then killed them by stabbing them. All the victims lived on the same street in Kongsberg, a town of 26,000 southwest of Oslo. Norway’s domestic intelligence agency has called for an independent investigation into how Andersen Braathen was captured amid criticism that the police response was too slow. Read more

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Russia says it's suspending its mission at NATO and ordering the closure of the alliance’s office in Moscow in retaliation to NATO’s expulsion of Russian diplomats. Earlier this month, NATO withdrew the accreditation of eight Russian officials to deny them access to its Brussels headquarters, saying it believes they have been secretly working as intelligence officers. NATO also halved the size of Moscow’s team at its headquarters from 20 to 10. Moscow has dismissed the accusations as baseless, and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov announced the Russian response Monday, announcing the suspension of Russia’s mission at NATO and the closure of the alliance’s military liaison and information offices in Moscow. Read more

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Colin Powell, former Joint Chiefs chairman and secretary of state, has died from COVID-19 complications. In an announcement on social media Monday, the family said Powell had been fully vaccinated. He was 84. Powell was the first African American to serve as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and secretary of state. But his reputation was forever stained when, in 2003, Powell went before the U.N. Security Council and made the case for U.S. war against Iraq. He cited faulty information claiming Saddam Hussein had secretly stashed away weapons of mass destruction. Iraq’s claims that it had not represented “a web of lies,” he told the world body. Read more

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Azerbaijan’s deputy foreign minister has accused Armenia of “ethnic cleansing” and continuing to lay landmines in Nagorno-Karabakh even after a cease-fire ended a six-week war in the disputed region late last year. His comments Monday came as a second case related to the conflict opened at the United Nations' top court. Armenia denied the accusations. The court held hearings last week into a complaint brought by Armenia against Azerbaijan also related to last year’s war that left more than 6,600 people dead. Read more

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One of the world’s last three countries to administer COVID-19 vaccines has started giving out doses as the East African nation of Burundi launched its national campaign. The vaccinations started in the commercial capital, Bujumbura, though health workers told The Associated Press that barely more than a dozen people had received doses by mid-afternoon. Recipients included the ministers of health and security. Only North Korea and the Horn of Africa nation of Eritrea have not administered any COVID-19 vaccines, according to the World Health Organization. Burundi’s previous government under the late President Pierre Nkurunziza had been criticized for taking the pandemic lightly. Read more

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Stocks edged lower in morning trading on Wall Street Monday as the market’s momentum slows following its best week since July. The S&P 500 index fell 0.1% and the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 0.4%. Technology and health care companies were leading the way lower, while energy companies bucked the downward trend and moved higher. Benchmark U.S. crude oil was up 0.8%. It has soared 70% so far this year. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 1.59%. Investors are in for another busy week of earnings reports from companies including Johnson & Johnson, Netflix and United Airlines. Read more

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Witnesses say Ethiopian military airstrikes have hit the capital of the country’s Tigray region and killed at least three people, returning the war abruptly to Mekele after several months of peace.. The airstrikes on Monday were confirmed by two humanitarian workers. They came days after a new military offensive was launched against the Tigray forces who have fought Ethiopian and allied forces for nearly a year. Spokespeople for the military and Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed didn't immediately respond to questions. Tigray along with areas of fighting in the neighboring Amhara and Afar regions are under a communications blackout, challenging efforts to verify information. Read more

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The Federal Reserve reported Monday that U.S. industrial production fell 1.3% in September, much more than expected as the lingering effects of Hurricane Ida continue to stymie activity. It was the worst showing since February’s 3.1% decline, when severe winter storms hammered much of the country. Nearly half, or 0.6% of the overall decline in total industrial production was attributable to the hurricane. The Fed revised August’s reading down from a 0.4% gain to a 0.1% decline. Industrial production covers manufacturing, utilities and mining.  Read more

Sweden’s foreign minister is visiting Israel in an effort to mend ties after years in which the two countries have been at odds over the conflict with the Palestinians. Sweden’s Social Democratic-led government recognized Palestinian statehood in 2014, making it the first large European country to do so since the end of the Cold War. Its former foreign minister’s comments in favor of the Palestinians in recent years drew angry responses from Israeli officials. Ann Linde's visit Monday was the first by a Swedish foreign minister in a decade. While acknowledging disagreements, she said Sweden is a “friend of Israel." She visited Israel's Holocaust memorial and met with Israeli officials. Read more

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Britain’s Parliament has opened a somber session to honor the Conservative lawmaker stabbed to death as he met constituents. The attack shocked Britain, and it has raised questions about how the country protects it politicians and grapples with extremism at home. It came five years after Labour Party lawmaker Jo Cox was murdered by a far-right extremist. The House of Commons returns Monday from a three-week break, and most of the scheduled business has been replaced by tributes to Amess. That will be followed by a service at the medieval St. Margaret’s Church beside Parliament. A 25-year-old British man with Somali heritage, Ali Harbi Ali, is being held under the Terrorism Act on suspicion of murder. Read more

Germany’s pro-business Free Democrats on Monday became the last of three parties to back the start of formal coalition talks on forming a new government. The Free Democrats leader, Christian Lindner, said the party’s national executive unanimously agreed to take the step following weeks of informal talks with the center-left Social Democrats and the environmentalist Greens. Lindner said the three parties hadn’t sought each other out ahead of the Sept. 26 election, “to put it diplomatically.” Lindner added that there remain “big differences on matters of substance” between the three parties but that this was a ”chance, though, to do good things for our country.” Outgoing Chancellor Angela Merkel will remain as a caretaker leader until the coalition government is in place. Read more

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Facebook says it plans to hire 10,000 workers in the European Union over the next five years to work on a new computing platform. The company said in a blog post Sunday that those high-skilled workers will help build “the metaverse,” a futuristic notion for connecting people online that uses augmented and virtual reality. Facebook executives have been touting the metaverse as the next big thing, though their track record is spotty on predicting future trends and it could raise questions about privacy and the social platform gaining more control in people’s lives. Facebook also is contending with antitrust crackdowns, the testimony of a whistleblowing ex-employee and concerns about how it handles misinformation.  Read more

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Italy’s president is criticizing the violent protests that have erupted against Italy’s new coronavirus health pass requirement to enter workplaces. President Sergio Mattarella says the protests appear aimed at jeopardizing Italy’s economic recovery just as it was getting going. His criticism came Monday as riot police again clashed with protesters at the port in the northern city of Trieste. The protesters oppose the Green Pass requirement. Italy on Friday became the first major European economy to require all workers, from hairdressers to factory workers, to present proof of vaccination, a negative test within the past 48 hours or proof of having been cured of COVID-19 to enter workplaces.  Read more

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Almost overnight, Japan has become a stunning, and somewhat mysterious, coronavirus success story. Daily new COVID-19 cases have plummeted after a mid-August peak that nearly reached 6,000 in Tokyo, with caseloads in the densely populated capital now below 100, an 11-month low. Possible factors include, after a long delay, a remarkable and rapid vaccination campaign and a shared practice, well before the pandemic, of wearing masks. The bars are packed, the trains are crowded, and the mood is celebratory, despite a general bafflement over what, exactly, is behind the sharp drop. Experts worry that without knowing how it cut cases so drastically, Japan may be in store for another devastating wave like during the summer. Read more

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Toyota plans to build a $1.29 billion factory in the U.S. to manufacture batteries for gas-electric hybrid and fully electric vehicles. The move comes amid a flurry of global announcements about shoring up production of batteries for electric vehicles. Most automakers are working to transition away from internal combustion engines to zero emission battery vehicles. The Toyota plant location wasn’t announced, but the company says it eventually will employ 1,750 people. Production would start in 2025, gradually expanding through 2031. The plant is part of $3.4 billion that Toyota plans to spend in the U.S. on automotive batteries during the next decade.  Read more

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The Biden administration is launching a wide-ranging strategy to regulate toxic industrial compounds used in products including cookware, carpets and firefighting foams. Environmental Protection Agency head Michael Regan says it's taking a series of actions to limit pollution from a cluster of long-lasting chemicals known as PFAS that are increasingly turning up in public drinking water systems, private wells and even food. The chemicals are associated with serious health conditions, including cancer. The plan being announced Monday in North Carolina is intended to restrict PFAS from being released into the environment, accelerate cleanup of PFAS-contaminated sites such as military bases and increase investments in research. Read more

Dualtone Records is marking the birthday of Chuck Berry by announcing the release of a live album from the late rock ’n roll legend. “Live From Blueberry Hill” is taken from performances recorded between July 2005 and January 2006 at Blueberry Hill café in St. Louis, one of Berry’s favorite places to play. The album will be released Dec. 17. The album features Berry tearing through classics like “Roll Over Beethoven,” “Sweet Little Sixteen” and “Johnny B. Goode.” In 1986, he became one of the first artists to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. His 95th birthday would have been Monday. Read more

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Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo is on a mission to save American jobs — one computer chip at a time. As President Joe Biden's de facto tech minister, Raimondo is tasked with ensuring the United States will be the world leader in computer chips. The Democratic president's political fortunes might ride on her performance. And so does America’s place atop the world as an economic and military power. Raimondo is working to increase production of chips as well as solar panels and batteries to help the United States thrive. The former Rhode Island governor is not afraid to set high expectations. Read more

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During the German occupation of Poland during World War II, the Germans imprisoned Jews in ghettoes and murdered them in death camps like Auschwitz, Treblinka and Sobibor. But they also shot them in fields and forests near their homes, leaving behind mass graves across Poland. Those graves have been coming to light in recent years and the Jewish community and activists have been working to ensure that the graves are officially marked. The aim is to give the Holocaust victims a dignified grave and to secure the spots so they are officially recognized. A recent such commemoration took place on Thursday in Wojslawice, a small town in eastern Poland.   Read more

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Some 300 male and female volunteers have stripped naked and donned white body paint for an artistic installation near the Dead Sea. Sunday's photo shoot by the American artist Spencer Tunick was promoted by Israel’s Tourism Ministry. Tunick has done similar installations in other exotic locales around the world, including French wine country, a Swiss glacier and a beach in South Africa. The volunteers disrobed and smeared their bodies with white paint in the desert outside the Israeli city of Arad. The shoot lasted around three hours, with the artist positioning the volunteers and the camera. Read more

Officials are predicting more rain as the death toll from floods and landslides in the southern Indian state of Kerala rose to 28. Since the ferocious downpours began last week, swollen rivers have decimated bridges, and vehicles and homes have been swept away. Several dams were nearing full capacity. A top meteorologist says the increased rainfall is linked to climate change and warmer oceans. The heavy rainfall resulted from a low-pressure area that formed over the southeastern Arabian sea and Kerala. It was expected to ease Monday, but the Meteorological Department warned that new rain-bearing winds would  hit the region starting Wednesday, bringing more precipitation. Read more

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China says its launch of a new spacecraft was merely a test to see whether the vehicle could be re-used. A Foreign Ministry spokesperson says the launch involved a spacecraft rather than a missile and was of “great significance for reducing the use-cost of spacecraft and could provide a convenient and affordable way to make a round trip for mankind’s peaceful use of space.” China’s space program is run by its military and is closely tied to its agenda of building hypersonic missiles and other technologies that could alter the balance of power with the United States. Read more

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A former Syrian lawmaker allegedly shot dead by an Israeli sniper has been laid to rest following an official funeral attended by hundreds of people near the Syrian capital. Midhat Saleh was fatally shot Saturday in Ein el-Tineh, a village along the Israeli border in the Golan Heights where he ran a Syrian government office. Syria said he was killed by Israeli sniper fire. Israeli officials declined to comment on the charge. Saleh’s coffin was wrapped in a Syrian flag Monday and brought to a town on the outskirts of Damascus for burial at a Druze cemetery. Hundreds of people attended, in addition to senior officials and Druze clerics.  Read more

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Three activists protesting human rights abuses in China have sneaked into the archaeological site where the flame lighting ceremony for the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics is being held and ran toward the Temple of Hera holding a Tibetan flag and a banner that read “No genocide games.” The protesters managed to enter the grounds and attempted to reach the area where the ceremony was being held. They were thrown to the ground by police and detained. The flame was lit at the Greek birthplace of the ancient Olympics under heavy police security. Read more

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The trial has opened of two men charged with murder in the killing of Dutch crime reporter Peter R. de Vries. The journalist was gunned down in the center of Amsterdam on July 6 in a brazen attack that sent shockwaves through the Netherlands. Dutch police say the suspected gunman is a 21-year-old Dutch man, while a 35-year-old Polish man is accused of being the getaway driver. They both were arrested shortly after De Vries was shot on an Amsterdam street after making one of his regular appearances on a Dutch television show. He died nine days later. Monday’s preliminary hearing is expected to hear a summary of the investigation so far and possible requests for further investigations from the suspects’ lawyers. Read more

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Hundreds of people have been ordered to report for jury duty in Georgia for what could be a long, laborious effort to find jurors for the trial of three white men charged with fatally shooting Ahmaud Arbery. Graphic video of the slaying of the 25-year-old Black man in 2020 sparked a national outcry. Father and son Greg and Travis McMichael and their neighbor, William “Roddie” Bryan are charged with murder and other crimes. Prosecutors say Arbery was merely jogging in the defendants’ neighborhood outside the port city of Brunswick. Defense attorneys insist the three men committed no crimes.  Read more

Journalists at one of Germany’s largest newspaper groups have protested their publisher’s decision to nix a lengthy investigation into alleged abuse of power by the chief editor of the country’s top-selling tabloid newspaper. A letter circulated on social media late Sunday accused Ippen.Media and its publisher of “breach of trust” for deciding to halt the investigation. The report had been months in the making and it was supposed to be published on Sunday. The investigation focused on Bild chief editor Julian Reichelt. He has faced scrutiny over his management style that allegedly included bullying and abusing his position of power toward female staff. Ippen.Media didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. Read more

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The Taiwanese company that manufactures smartphones for Apple Inc. and other global brands says it plans to make electric cars for auto brands under a similar contract model. The chairman of Foxconn Technology Group said it will produce cars and buses for brands in China, North America, Europe and other markets. Young Liu said clients can modify their appearance and features. Liu said the flagship Model E sedan, developed with Italian design house Pininfarina, is due to be launched in 2023. Liu said it will have a range of 750 kilometers (470 miles) on one charge. Liu mentioned automakers Fisker Inc. and Taiwan’s Yulong Group as clients. Read more