The impeachment inquiry is intensifying. A key witness at a closed-door hearing was a no show, on orders from the State Department. Many lawmakers are talking about this latest development, including Lehigh Valley Congresswoman Susan Wild.

U.S. Rep. Wild (D) says she believes the facts are the driving force in the inquiry, and that those facts need to come to light. She said she's concerned about Tuesday's developments.

Speaking on WFMZ's Business Matters, Wild addressed the latest impeachment inquiry news. The White House blocked US Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland from testifying before the committee.

"We are trying very hard to do this quickly, expeditiously and respectfully. But if the administration continues to stonewall the inquiry we're going to have no choice but to take it up a notch," Wild said. 

Wild says she was opposed to an impeachment inquiry until she read the transcript of President Trump's Ukraine call and the whistleblower report. She says she believes Democrats aren't rushing to judgment and will let the facts speak for themselves.

But some Republicans don't see it that way.

"We understand the reason why the State Department decided not to have Ambassador Sondland here today. It's based on the unfair and partisan process that Mr. Schiff has been running. You think about what the Democrats are trying to do, impeach the President of the United States 13 months prior to an election," Rep. Jim Jordan said.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff says blocking Sondland from testifying and producing documents could be considered obstructing the constitutional functions of Congress.

Democrats are now talking about issuing a subpoena for Sondland to appear.

"This is an impeachment inquiry and there are rules that have to be followed. And you cannot just tell people that they shouldn't testify and I think that they're absolutely right that the ambassador does need to be subpoenaed," Wild said.

Wild says she hopes that the inquiry doesn't drag out and take the focus away from what she calls "bread and butter kitchen table" issues that are the day to day focus of the American people.