A celery stalk sighting and a little luck came together to help a New Hampshire man find his wife’s wedding rings in a 20-ton trash trailer, wrapped in a napkin that he had accidentally thrown away. Kevin Butler took the trash to a transfer station in Windham last week. He had tossed the napkin into the trash, not realizing that his wife had cleaned the rings and wrapped them in the napkin to dry. Several hours later, Dennis Senibaldi and staff at the transfer station reviewed surveillance video and used an excavator to go through the bags. Senibaldi said they zeroed in on one with a celery stalk. The napkin with the rings was at the bottom.

A celery stalk sighting and a little luck came together to help a New Hampshire man find his wife’s wedding rings in a 20-ton trash trailer, wrapped in a napkin that he had accidentally thrown away. Kevin Butler took the trash to a transfer station in Windham last week. He had tossed the napkin into the trash, not realizing that his wife had cleaned the rings and wrapped them in the napkin to dry. Several hours later, Dennis Senibaldi and staff at the transfer station reviewed surveillance video and used an excavator to go through the bags. Senibaldi said they zeroed in on one with a celery stalk. The napkin with the rings was at the bottom.

A group of police officers who helped deliver a baby at a Long Island home over the weekend included a sergeant who helped another newborn take his first breath five years ago. This time, Suffolk County Sgt. Jon-Erik Negron joined officers Conor Diemer, Jadin Rodriguez and Zachary Vormittag after a woman went into labor at her Shirley home on Saturday. Back in August 2017, Negron responded when a Mount Sinai woman unexpectedly went into labor and gave birth at home. Negron cleared fluid from the infant's airway, and the boy started breathing. The sergeant is now that child's godfather.

A long-forgotten, and somewhat unsettling, statue of Mickey Mouse with giant lobster claws for hands has found its way back to Boston. The 700-pound statue dubbed “Lobsta Mickey” was commissioned by Disney. It was last seen in the city nearly two decades ago at Quincy Market. It entertained tourists and shoppers before slipping out of sight and into city lore. It was sold in 2005 at an auction organized by Disney. Creative director for the Boston sneaker store Concepts, Deon Point, became fixated on tracking down the 6-foot-tall creation before finally discovering a listing for the mouse/crustacean relic on eBay. It now resides on the store's showroom floor.

Yes, they’ve nicknamed the baby “Nugget,” after a woman delivered a girl at an Atlanta McDonald’s. Alandria Worthy gave birth to her daughter on Wednesday after her fiancé pulled over so she could use the bathroom on the way to the hospital. Three employees and fiancé Deandre Phillips helped Worthy deliver. The girl's name is Nandi Ariyah Moremi Phillips, but restaurant manager Tunisia Woodward says she immediately nicknamed the child “McDonald's Little Nugget.” The parents credit Woodward and the two other employees, all mothers, with coaching them through the birth. The franchise owner gave each of the three employees $250 gift cards. Woodward says she’ll spend all the money on the baby.

The World Cup 2010 in South Africa had Shakira. The 1998 tournament in France had Ricky Martin. The unofficial soundtrack of the World Cup in Qatar is fast becoming the incessant chanting of street marshals, better knows as Last Mile Marshals. Seated all over Doha on high chairs more commonly used by lifeguards at swimming pools, these migrant workers have become a staple of the Middle East’s first World Cup. They point visitors flooding into this Arabian Peninsula nation in the right direction on their search for public transportation. It’s an important crowd control measure as some 1.2 million fans are expected to inundate Qatar, a country home to 3 million people.

Don’t accuse the TSA of catnapping on the job. When an alert agent at New York’s John F. Kennedy airport noticed tufts of orange fur poking out of a slightly unzipped suitcase, it gave him pause. As the bag went through the X-ray unit Nov. 16, the Transportation Security Administration agent was in for a surprise: Inside were four paws and a tail belonging to a feline stowaway. A TSA spokesperson on Tuesday tweeted a photo of the cat's fur peaking out the suitcase. The cat, identified by the New York Post as “Smells,” was returned to its owner. She says Smells must have crawled into the suitcase of a visiting friend.

Firefighters in Alaska got an unusual request for assistance last weekend from the Alaska Wildlife Troopers, but it wasn’t your mundane cat-stuck-in-a-tree situation. Instead, Capt. Josh Thompson with Central Emergency Services on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula said they were needing help getting a moose out of a basement. The 1-year-old bull weighing up to 500 pounds had fallen through a window well into a home's basement. Authorities were able to tranquilize the moose, and six firefighters helped carry it out on a stretcher intended for a large human. A reversal agent for the tranquilizer was administered, and after a while the moose happily haunted back into the woods.

A historic home featured in the classic film “The Goonies” is for sale in Astoria, Oregon. Built in 1896, the house has sweeping views of the Columbia River flowing into the Pacific Ocean. It's listed with an asking price of $1.7 million. The home's relator says potential buyers are considering making it more accessible to the public. Since the film was released in 1985, fans have flocked to the home, prompting the owner to close it to foot traffic at times. The steady stream of visitors has also sparked resident complaints and forced local officials to restrict parking. The city celebrates Goonies Day each June 7.

Bob Dylan’s publisher is offering refunds for a $600 special edition of his new book, “The Philosophy of Modern Song.” Simon & Schuster acknowledged Sunday that the allegedly “hand-signed” copies were not individually inscribed. The statement came after days of complaints from customers, who through social media had compared their copies and found the autographs suspiciously alike. The books had arrived with a letter from Simon & Schuster CEO Jonathan Karp, vouching for the signature’s authenticity. Dylan’s book, in which he assesses songs ranging from Hank Williams “Your Cheatin’ Heart” to Jackson Browne’s “The Pretender,” was published Nov. 1. A Dylan spokesperson declined comment.

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The former CEO of the failed cryptocurrency exchange FTX says that he did not "knowingly” misuse customers' funds. He also says he believes his millions of angry customers will eventually be made whole. The comments from Sam Bankman-Fried came during an interview with Andrew Ross Sorkin at conference put on by The New York Times. Bankman-Fried has done a handful of media interviews since FTX collapsed in mid-November, but Wednesday's was his first video interview since it filed for bankruptcy protection on Nov. 11. FTX failed in the cryptocurrency version of a bank run. Read moreEx-FTX CEO says he didn't 'knowingly' misuse clients' funds

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Amazon CEO Andy Jassy has said the company does not have plans to stop selling the antisemitic film that gained notoriety recently after Brooklyn Nets guard Kyrie Irving tweeted out an Amazon link to it. Pressure has been mounting on Amazon to stop selling the film or add a disclaimer to the documentary and the related book that it sells on its site. Jassy addressed the company's handling of the issue at the New York Times’ DealBook Summit in New York City. He says Amazon is a retailer of content to millions of customers with different viewpoints, and it has to allow access to those viewpoints even if they're objectionable. Read moreAmazon CEO says company won't take down antisemitic film

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A judge has declared a mistrial at the rape trial of “That ’70s Show” actor Danny Masterson. Jurors told Los Angeles Judge Charlaine Olmedo that they were hopelessly deadlocked and could not come to unanimous verdicts on any counts.  The judge declared a mistrial Wednesday afternoon. Masterson is charged with the rape of three women, including a former girlfriend, between 2001 and 2003, when he was at the height of his fame as a star of the Fox sitcom “That ’70s Show.” Masterson pleaded not guilty. His attorney argued that the acts were consensual. A retrial is scheduled for March, but Masterson's lawyer says he will seek to dismiss the case before then. Read moreMistrial declared in actor Danny Masterson's rape trial

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A campaign to vaccinate older Chinese has sparked hopes Beijing might roll back severe anti-virus controls that prompted angry protesters to demand President Xi Jinping resign. But the country faces daunting hurdles before “zero COVID” can end. Global stock markets rose after Beijing announced the long-awaited campaign Tuesday. A low vaccination rate is one of the biggest obstacles to ending curbs that confine millions of people to their homes. Health experts and economists warn a vaccination effort will take months. They say China also must build up its hospitals and work out a long-term virus strategy, so “zero COVID” is likely to stay in place until mid-2023 and possibly as late as 2024. Read moreChinese vaccine plans spark hope for end of 'zero COVID'

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Mickey Joseph, Nebraska’s interim football coach for nine games after Scott Frost’s firing, was arrested Wednesday on suspicion of strangulation and third-degree domestic assault. Police went to a Lincoln residence in the afternoon after a report of a domestic disturbance. Following an investigation, the 54-year-old Joseph was arrested at another location in the city. He was being held at Lancaster Country Jail. Further details weren’t released. Matt Rhule was introduced as the Cornhuskers’ head coach Monday. Athletic director Trev Alberts had said Joseph was among candidates he spoke with about the job. Read moreFormer Nebraska interim coach arrested in domestic case

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The world’s largest volcano is oozing rivers of glowing lava and drawing thousands of awestruck viewers who jammed a Hawaii highway that could soon be covered by the flow. Mauna Loa awoke from its 38-year slumber Sunday, causing volcanic ash and debris to drift down from the sky. On Wednesday, a main highway linking towns on the east and west coasts of the Big Island became an impromptu viewing point. Thousands of cars jammed the highway near Volcanoes National Park. Anne Andersen left her overnight shift as a nurse to see the spectacle. She was afraid that the road would soon be closed. Read moreViewers flock to watch glowing lava ooze from Hawaii volcano

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The White House says Thursday's state dinner for the president of France is meant to highlight the ties that bind the United States and its oldest ally. First lady Jill Biden and White House staff previewed the arrangements on Wednesday. Maine lobster poached in butter, beef with shallot marmalade and a trio of American cheeses are on the menu. Dessert is orange chiffon cake, with roasted pears and creme fraiche ice cream. A glitzy White House state dinner is a high diplomatic honor reserved for only the closest U.S. allies. Thursday's affair will be the first one of the Biden administration. Read moreRed, white, blue theme for French White House state dinner

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The National Christmas Tree is now blazing with bright color. President Joe Biden led a crowd on the Ellipse near the White House in lighting the tree Wednesday evening in a tradition that dates back a century. Biden led the crowd in a countdown — “five, four, three, two, one”— and the lights burst to life. The tradition dates back to 1923 when President Calvin Coolidge walked from the White House to the Ellipse to light a 48-foot fir tree decorated with 2,500 electric bulbs in red, white and green. The current tree, a 27-foot-white fir, was planted just last year. Read moreNational Christmas Tree blazes to life with Biden lighting

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has called for a major political conference before the end of the year to talk about key state affairs, where he’s expected to address his increasingly tense relations with Washington and Seoul over the expansion of his nuclear and missile programs. North Korea has ramped up missile testing to a record pace this year, dialing up pressure on Washington and Seoul. But Kim has also been struggling to improve a heavily sanctioned economy made worse by pandemic border closures. That's an issue he may also address during the year-end meeting. In recent years, Kim has used political conferences in late December or early January to reveal his most important goals. Read moreNorth Korea's Kim calls for meeting to review state affairs

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Some $3.1 billion was donated to charitable causes in the U.S. in the 24 hours that are called Giving Tuesday. The movement to donate on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving started as a hashtag in 2012 and 10 years later has become a staple of fundraising for nonprofits. Asha Curran is the CEO of the organization GivingTuesday, which grew out of the hashtag. She said despite a difficult economic year, people we as generous as they had the capacity to be. Read moreGivingTuesday raises $3.1B for charities in tough economy

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Jurors have convicted a man in the killings of eight people from another Ohio family after weighing his denials and other testimony against the word of witnesses including his brother and mother, who previously pleaded guilty for their roles. Thirty-one-year-old George Wagner IV was found guilty Wednesday of all 22 counts he faced in southern Ohio’s Pike County, including eight counts of aggravated murder in the 2016 shootings of seven adults and a teenager from the Rhoden family. Wagner sat motionless as the verdicts were read, closing his eyes or looking down. Prosecutors say the slayings, which initially spurred speculation about drug cartel involvement, stemmed from a dispute over custody of Wagner’s niece. His father awaits trial in the killings. Read moreJury convicts man in killings of 8 from another Ohio family

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President Joe Biden is pledging to give Native Americans a stronger voice in federal affairs. At the first in-person summit on tribal affairs in six years, he says he'll foster “respect for Indigenous knowledge and tribal consultations” in government decision-making. Biden has announced new steps to establish uniform standards for federal agencies to consult with tribes, as well as a plan to revitalize Native languages and new efforts to strengthen the tribal rights outlined in existing treaties. Biden also has announced $135 million in federal funds to help 11 tribes plan for and relocate to safe ground as they face impacts from climate-related environmental threats. Read moreBiden pledges new commitments, respect for tribal nations

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They want money — that’s what they want, that’s what they want. Well, now the Rolling Stones can say they’re also ON money, the face of a new collectible coin issued by Britain’s Royal Mint to celebrate the band’s 60th anniversary. The new 5-pound coin features a silhouette of the iconic band performing — frontman Mick Jagger, guitarists Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood, and late drummer Charlie Watts — as well as the band’s name in what is described as their classic 1973 font. The mint said it was one of the last coins of the year to be released bearing the image of Queen Elizabeth II, who died in September at 96. Read moreRolling Stones' 60th year honored with UK collectible coin

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An Atlantic hurricane season with 14 named storms has ended, leaving residents in the Florida Keys to celebrate even as others around Florida and Puerto Rico continue to deal with the damage caused by Hurricanes Ian, Nicole and Fiona. Of the 2022 season’s named storms, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says eight became hurricanes, with winds of at least 74 mph. Two fo them intensified to major hurricanes with winds reaching at least 111 mph. Forecaster say an average hurricane season, which runs from June 1 to Nov. 30, has 14 named storms, seven hurricanes and three major hurricanes. This season was notable for a record-tying inactive August. Read moreAtlantic hurricane season ends with 14 named storms

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A preliminary report from federal officials on a deadly midair collision at a Dallas air show says no guidance was given on altitudes before a World War II-era fighter plane crashed into a bomber. The National Transportation Safety Board's report released Wednesday does not give a cause of the crash. It says that just before, a formation of fighters was instructed to fly in front of a formation of bombers. All six people aboard the two planes died in the Nov. 12 crash. An NTSB spokesman says the agency is trying to determine the sequence of maneuvers that led to the crash. Read moreReport: No altitude advice before Dallas air show crash