NASA wants its moon dust and cockroaches back. The space agency has asked Boston-based RR Auction to halt the sale of moon dust collected during the 1969 Apollo 11 mission that had subsequently been fed to cockroaches during an experiment to determine if the lunar material contained any sort of pathogen that posed a threat to terrestrial life. NASA said in a letter to the auctioneer that it still belongs to the federal government. RR said Thursday that the material from the experiment was expected to sell for at least $400,000, but has been pulled from the auction block.

A giant stingray caught in the Mekong River last week is more than a giant — it is the biggest of them all. Scientists say the stingray that measured 13 feet from snout to tail is the world’s largest recorded freshwater fish. It was documented by Wonders of the Mekong, a joint Cambodian-U.S. research project. The Mekong runs through China, Myanmar, Laos, Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam. It is home to several species of giant freshwater fish, but environmental pressures are threatening their survival. Researchers say the fish's size is important because fish take time to mature. The stingray was implanted with a tracking tag before it was released back into the river.

A minister in Pakistan’s newly elected government is facing criticism following his plea to the nation to drink less tea to help save on imports amid a deepening economic crisis. Tea is a hugely popular drink among both the rich and the poor in this country of 220 million people and the government has to spend about $600 million dollars from its hard currency reserves for tea imports annually. A Pakistani is believed to drink at least three cups a day. Still, Planning Minister Ahsan Iqbal’s appeal on Tuesday for Pakistanis to drink “one or two cups a day” less surprised many, leading to calls on social media for him to resign.

A small airplane that had run out of fuel made an emergency landing Monday evening in a commercial area neighboring downtown Anchorage. The plane landed safely on a street and pulled into a nearby parking lot. The Anchorage Daily News reports once it was refueled, the plane taxied to the nearby small airplane airport under police escort. The plane had a flight instructor and student pilot on board. Neither were injured. The plane was not damaged in the landing. Authorities said the Cessna 150 was attempting to return to the airport when it ran out of fuel.

A woman who says she suffered serious injuries while trying to save her neighbors' dog from a canal can't sue the pooch's owners. New Jersey's Supreme Court on Monday rejected Ann Samolyk's claims that laws that allow legal action for injuries suffered in a rescue of a person who put themselves in peril can apply to property as well. In her lawsuit, Samolyk alleged she suffered neurological damage after jumping into the canal in Lacey Township at the New Jersey shore in 2017 to save the dog after she heard someone call for help. The dog was unharmed.

A lawyer for a father-son team of treasure hunters is accusing the FBI of either lying to a federal judge about having video of its 2018 dig for legendary Civil War-era gold, or illegally destroying the video. The FBI has acknowledged it was looking for gold at the Pennsylvania site but says it found nothing of value. The duo believes the FBI recovered a huge cache of gold and have sued for information about the dig. Their lawyer is now asking a judge to impose sanctions after the FBI claimed it had no video of the secretive excavation, even though evidence suggests otherwise. The FBI has been asked for comment.

The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority is going to tackle the nuisance of public urination with technology. The MBTA is launching a pilot program this summer in which urine detection sensors will be placed in four downtown elevators. The data will be collected for several months with a goal of creating a system that can alert transit ambassadors to dispatch a cleaning crew. The MBTA said public urination is not only unsanitary but can also damage elevators. The sensors are not a new concept. Nearly a decade ago, the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority launched a program that triggered strobe lights, alarms and alerts to MARTA police when urine was detected.

Swedish retailer Ikea is known for the distinctive names of its flat-pack home products. Now, the company’s Norway branch wants to use the brand’s experience to help parents browsing the baby-naming department. Ikea Norway has built “a name bank” with more than 800 listings available on its website. The names are drawn from ones Ikea gave its furniture instead of product numbers since 1948. “After all these years, (Ikea) has built up a large ‘catalog’ to pick from,” Ikea Norway said in a statement. Norway registered the births of 56,060 babies last year, or 3,081 more than in 2020. The Ikea branch says that makes it harder to find a unique name.

In the wiggle of a nose, a man covered the “Bewitched” statue in Salem, Massachusetts, with red paint. Police say witnesses called police at about 5 p.m. Monday to report someone spray painting the bronze statue. The statue depicts actor Elizabeth Montgomery, as Samantha Stephens in the 1960s sitcom, sitting on a broomstick in front of a crescent moon. An officer in the area spotted a man fitting the description of the vandal and after a brief chase arrested a city resident on charges of defacing property, resisting arrest and disorderly conduct. He was held on $500 bail. The statue, erected in 2005, has been cleaned.

Authorities say a quick-thinking custodian safely confined a mountain lion in an empty classroom after it entered a Northern California high school. The San Mateo County Sheriff's Office says no students or staff were at Pescadero High School south of San Francisco yet when the cat strolled onto campus.  An official says the animal, estimated to be about 40 pounds, appeared “lost and scared.” California wildlife officials tranquilized the cat and took it to the Oakland Zoo, where it was determined to be an underweight male about 4 to 6 months old. The cat will have a fractured tooth removed before it's released back into the wild.

US and World News

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The shopping mall in the central Ukrainian city of Kremenchuk was nothing extraordinary, but in the middle of war it offered an escape for some residents. In a few moments on Monday, it suddenly became a hellish inferno after it was hit by a Russian airstrike. Authorities say at least 18 people are dead, more than 20 are missing and scores are wounded. The Kremenchuk mall is now the latest addition to the allegations of war crimes levied against Russia in the Ukraine war. One mall employee who said he had stepped outside for a cigarette when the air raid siren went off estimated 1,000 people had been in the mall, contradicting Russia’s claim it was empty. Read more

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Baidu Inc. is China's highest-profile competitor in a multibillion-dollar race with Alphabet Inc.'s Waymo and General Motors Co.'s Cruise to create self-driving cars. Baidu is test-driving more than 500 self-driving vehicles on the streets of Beijing and other Chinese cities. The company and a rival, Pony.ai, received China's first licenses in April to operate taxis with no one in the driver's seat but a safety supervisor on board. Baidu says its technology, if successful, could make driving cheaper and safer. Autonomous driving is part of an array of emerging technologies from artificial intelligence to renewable energy that Chinese companies are pouring billions of dollars into trying to create, urged on by the ruling Communist Party. Read more

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New York’s recreational marijuana market is beginning to sprout, literally. Thin-leafed plants are stretching toward the sun in farms around the state. In a novel move, New York gave 203 CBD hemp growers first shot at cultivating marijuana destined for legal sales, which could start by the end of the year. Big indoor growers are expected to join later. Giving a head start to hemp growers is an unusual way to gear up a marijuana market. States typically rely initially on their existing medical growers, like New Jersey did for its launch earlier this year. Read more

Shares have retreated in Asia after another broad decline on Wall Street as markets remain gripped by uncertainty over inflation, rising interest rates and the potential for a recession. U.S. futures rose while oil prices fell back. On Tuesday, the S&P 500 fell 2%, the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 1.6%, and the Nasdaq fell 3% after The Conference Board reported that consumer confidence fell in June to its lowest level in more than a year. It cited concerns over inflation, including rising prices for gas and food. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note, which helps set mortgage rates, slipped to 3.17%. Read more

The Supreme Court's ruling allowing states to regulate abortion has set off a travel scramble in some parts of the U.S.,  as abortion providers redirect patients to states that still allow the procedure. A growing number of states are moving to mostly banning abortion. Clinics operators are moving, doctors are counseling crying patients, donations are pouring into nonprofits and one group is dispatching vans to administer abortion pills. Some cities _ like Kansas City and St. Louis _ also are drafting plans to help with the travel logistics. Groups are trying to help with everything from gas cards for travel to connecting patients with small aircraft pilots willing to transport them to a clinic in another state. Read more

Matt Olson homered twice and Travis d’Arnaud also went deep to lift the Atlanta Braves to a 5-3 victory over the Philadelphia Phillies on Tuesday night. Read more

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Nebraska state Sen. Mike Flood has won a special election to replace former U.S. Rep. Jeff Fortenberry, a fellow Republican who was sentenced to two years of probation earlier in the day for a conviction on charges that he lied to federal agents. Flood beat Democratic state Sen. Patty Pansing Brooks in the state’s Republican-leaning 1st District, which includes Lincoln and dozens of smaller towns in eastern Nebraska. Flood, a former speaker of the Nebraska Legislature, will serve the rest of what would have been Fortenberry’s ninth term. He’ll be a strong favorite to win a new term in November, when he faces Pansing Brooks again in the general election. Read more

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Bodies without identification documents, remote villages without phone service, the need to share fingerprint data across borders and even stolen IDs are complicating efforts to identify the 51 dead migrants found in San Antonio as families from Mexico to Honduras worry their loved ones could be among them. Few identities of the dead migrants found in the back of a trailer have been made public more than a day after they were found, illustrating the challenges authorities face in tracing people who cross borders clandestinely. Bexar County Commissioner Rebeca Clay-Flores, who represents the district where the truck was abandoned, said that by Tuesday afternoon, medical examiners had potentially identified 34 of the victims. Read more

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Filipino journalist and Nobel Peace Prize winner Maria Ressa says in a speech in Hawaii Tuesday that the Philippine government is affirming a previous order to shut down her news site. Rappler has gained notoriety for its reporting of President Rodrigo Duterte’s bloody crackdown on illegal drugs. Ressa is the first ever Filipino and first working journalist in more than 80 years to win the Nobel Peace Prize. She was a featured speaker at the East-West Center’s International Media Conference. Ressa learned of the order from Rappler’s attorneys. She says they plan to appeal. Read more

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Kathy Hochul has won the Democratic nomination for New York governor, setting her on an expected path to win the governor’s office in November. Hochul beat back primary challenges Tuesday from New York City’s elected public advocate, Jumaane Williams, and U.S. Rep. Tom Suozzi, a moderate from Long Island. Democrats have more than twice as many registered voters as Republicans in the state and are expected to keep the governor’s mansion this fall. Republicans nominated U.S. Rep. Lee Zeldin to challenge Hochul in November. The Long Island representative was among the Republicans in Congress who voted against certifying the 2020 election results. Read more

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Desperate families of migrants from Mexico and Central America are seeking word of their loved ones as authorities begin identifying 51 people who died after being abandoned in a tractor-trailer without air conditioning in the sweltering Texas heat. It was the deadliest tragedy to claim the lives of migrants smuggled across the border from Mexico. U.S. Rep. Henry Cuellar of Texas told The Associated Press that the driver of the truck and two other people were arrested. The bodies were discovered Monday afternoon on the outskirts of San Antonio when a city worker heard a cry for help from a truck parked on a lonely back road. Read more

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A former Trump White House aide has painted a portrait of a volatile commander-in-chief who lashed out at advisers as his grasp on power was extinguished. Though accounts of the former president’s temper are legion, Cassidy Hutchinson offered previously unknown details about the extent of Trump’s rage in his final weeks of office, his awareness that supporters had weapons with them and his ambivalence as rioters later laid siege to the Capitol. The testimony to the House Jan. 6 committee deepened questions about whether Trump himself could face criminal charges for his conduct and came as Trump weighs running for reelection in 2024. Read more

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U.S. health officials are expanding the group of people recommended to get vaccinated against the monkeypox virus. They also say they are providing more monkeypox vaccine, working to expand testing, and taking other steps to try to get ahead of the outbreak. As of Tuesday, the U.S. had identified 306 cases in 27 states and the District of Columbia. More than 4,700 cases have been found in more than 40 other countries outside the areas of Africa where the virus is endemic. Read more

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A federal court has allowed Tennessee to ban abortions as early as six weeks into pregnancy. Texas is already enforcing a six-week ban, but a judge Tuesday temporarily blocked an even stricter decades-old law from taking effect. The moves embody a flurry of activity that was set off at courthouses across the country after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week and ruled that terminating a pregnancy is not a constitutional right. Roughly half the states are expected to prohibit or severely limit the procedure now that the high court has left it up to them. Read more

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The NFL insisted on an indefinite suspension while Deshaun Watson’s legal team argued there’s no basis for that punishment as both sides presented their cases in front of a retired judge in Delaware on Tuesday, two people in attendance told The Associated Press. The hearing will continue on Wednesday and Watson is scheduled to be there for the duration, according to the people who spoke on condition of anonymity because the hearing isn’t public. Former U.S. District Judge Sue Robinson, who was jointly appointed by the league and the NFL Players’ Association, will determine whether Watson violated the NFL’s personal conduct policy and whether to impose discipline. Read more

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Two years after completing a White House summer internship, Cassidy Hutchinson was in the room where the president’s top aides debated how they could overturn his election loss. The former aide to chief of staff Mark Meadows testified Tuesday at a surprise hearing of the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection. Hutchinson disclosed new details about what Meadows and former President Donald Trump knew about possible violence at the Jan. 6 rally. She testified that she heard Trump demand that attendees not be screened, saying, “I don’t effing care that they have weapons. They’re not here to hurt me.” Read more

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France’s president has denounced Russia’s fiery airstrike on a crowded shopping mall in Ukraine as a “new war crime” and vowed the West’s support for Kyiv would not waver. Emmanuel Macron said Tuesday that Moscow “cannot and should not win” the war. The strike killed at least 18 people in the central city of Kremenchuk. It came during an unusually intense barrage of Russian strikes across Ukraine that drew new attention to a war that some fear could fade from focus as it drags on. Also Tuesday, Turkey lifted its objections to Sweden and Finland joining NATO. And in a virtual address to the U.N. Security Council, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy called for Russia to be expelled from the United Nations. Read more

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President Joe Biden’s top health official says that “every option is on the table” when it comes to helping women access abortion in the wake of the Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade. But there's only so much the administration can do despite its strong criticism of the Supreme Court’s decision Friday. Biden called it “a sad day for the court and the country.” The secretary of Health and Human Services, Xavier Becerra, on Tuesday called it “despicable." Becerra said that the administration would work to ensure that medication abortions remain available, patient privacy is preserved and family planning care is protected. Read more

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The man who served as the U.S. Senate’s sergeant at arms and resigned after the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol has died. Michael Stenger was 71. Two people familiar with the matter tell The Associated Press that Stenger died Monday of natural causes. One of the people says he had been diagnosed with cancer and had been ill. Stenger had served in the role as the sergeant-at-arms since 2018 and had previously worked for the U.S. Secret Service for more than three decades. The Senate majority leader at the time, Mitch McConnell, requested Stenger’s resignation the day after the pro-Trump mob stormed the Capitol. Read more

Dozens of trucks were blocked from entering Buenos Aires as part of growing demonstrations against diesel shortages in the latest example of growing fuel protests in South America amid higher international prices as a result of Russia’s war in Ukraine. In Peru, truckers continued their strike for a second day demanding lower prices on Tuesday. In Ecuador, the president is calling off negotiations with the largest Indigenous group that has been protesting for more than two weeks after a military officer that was part of a fuel convoy in the Amazon was killed. Read more

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Ghislaine Maxwell has been sentenced to 20 years in prison for helping the wealthy financier Jeffrey Epstein sexually abuse teenage girls. The sentencing Tuesday was the culmination of a prosecution that detailed how Epstein and Maxwell flaunted their riches and associations with prominent people to groom vulnerable girls and then exploit them. Those crimes occurred as the couple hobnobbed with some of the world’s most famous and wealthy people, including Bill Clinton and Donald Trump and England’s Prince Andrew. Epstein killed himself in jail while awaiting trial. Maxwell blamed the abuse on Epstein and said meeting him was the greatest regret of her life. Read more

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Instagram is blocking posts that mention abortion from public view, in some cases requiring users to confirm their age before letting them view posts offering information about the procedure. Over the last day, several abortion advocacy Instagram pages have found their posts or stories were hidden with a warning that described the posts as “sensitive content.” The Associated Pres identified a half-dozen other posts that mentioned the word “abortion” and were subsequently covered up by Instagram. All of the posts were informational in nature, and none of the posts featured photos of abortions. Read more

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A jury of seven men and five women has been tentatively chosen to decide whether Florida school shooter Nikolas Cruz should be sentenced to death or get life in prison for the 2018 attack. The selection of a dozen jurors on Tuesday for Cruz's penalty trial capped a nearly three-month selection process that began with 1,800 candidates in April. The jury will decide whether Cruz receives the death sentence or life without parole for the murders of 14 students and three staff members at Parkland’s Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Feb. 14, 2018. Cruz pleaded guilty in October to those murders and 17 counts of attempted murder —so jurors will only decide his punishment. Read more

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Researchers have diagnosed chronic traumatic encephalopathy in a Major League Soccer player for the first time. The Boston University CTE Center says defender Scott Vermillion suffered from the degenerative brain disease that has been linked to repeated blows to the head. Vermillion died of an accidental drug overdose in December 2020 at the age of 44. CTE has been found in more than 100 former NFL players as well as semi-pro and high school soccer players. Vermillion is the first from MLS. He played in four MLS seasons for D.C. United, the Colorado Rapids and the Kansas City Wizards. Read more

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The Supreme Court has put on hold a lower court ruling that Louisiana must draw new congressional districts before the 2022 elections to increase Black voting power. With the three liberal justices dissenting, the high court short-circuited an order from a federal judge to create a second majority Black congressional district in Louisiana. The state’s Republican-dominated legislature earlier approved a congressional map with white majorities in five of six districts. Read more

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Mets ace Max Scherzer will make a minor league rehab start for Double-A Binghamton on Wednesday. The outing against the Hartford Yard Goats was pushed back a day, but New York manager Buck Showalter says there’s been no setback in Scherzer’s recovery from a strained oblique. Scherzer will be pitching on seven days of rest after his first rehab start with the Rumble Ponies on June 21. A three-time Cy Young Award winner, the 37-year-old Scherzer is 5-1 with a 2.54 ERA in eight starts during his first season with the Mets. He’s been out since May 18. Read more

The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors has returned ownership of prime California beachfront property to descendants of a Black couple who built a resort for African Americans but were stripped of the land in the 1920s. The board unanimously approved a motion to complete the transfer of parcels in an area once known as Bruce’s Beach in the city of Manhattan Beach that are now the site of the county’s lifeguard training headquarters and its parking lot. The land was purchased in 1912 by Willa and Charles Bruce, who ran a resort for Black people until the city took the land through eminent domain. The county eventually ended up with the property. Read more

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The Federal Trade Commission says it has sued Walmart for allowing its money transfer services to be used by scam artists who the agency says fleeced hundreds of millions of dollars from consumers. In its lawsuit, the FTC alleges that for years, Walmart failed to properly secure the money transfer services offered at its stores. The agency says Walmart didn’t properly train its employees, failed to alert customers, and used procedures that allowed fraudsters to cash out at its stores. The FTC is asking the court to order Walmart to return money to consumers and impose civil penalties on the company. Walmart called the lawsuit factually flawed and legally baseless. Read more

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More than 200 employees at Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts have ratified a contract that includes better pay and benefits. The unionized workers are joining a wave of other recent union developments at some of the nation’s most prestigious museums. Officials said Tuesday that the collective bargaining agreement is the first since museum workers voted to join the United Auto Workers Local 2110 in November 2020. The union's president says the contract provides a more equitable compensation structure and a democratic voice for the staff. The union represents 227 of the museum’s administrative, technical, curatorial and conservation employees. Read more

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With abortion now or soon to be illegal in over a dozen states and severely restricted in many more, Big Tech companies that vacuum up personal details of their users are facing new calls to limit that tracking and surveillance. One fear is that law enforcement or vigilantes could use data troves from Facebook, Google and other social platforms against people seeking ways to end unwanted pregnancies. History has repeatedly demonstrated that whenever people’s personal data is tracked and stored, there’s always a risk that it could be misused or abused. Read more