Local News

Updated

Workers at Coca-Cola's distribution center in Bethlehem have walked off the job. Read more

Updated

There's a window for a little light snow later Tuesday night into Wednesday, with a ground-whitening coating to an inch possible for some. Read more

Updated

With COVID-19 case numbers again on the rise and vaccine availability getting tighter, the Olivet Boys & Girls Club and the county health center are teaming up. Read more

Updated

Bethlehem Area School District Board President Michael Faccinetto wants the board out of naming and renaming facilities. Read more

Updated

'I've been a firefighter 45 years and I'll tell you...that was quite an unusual situation. I was scared there for a while.' Read more

Updated

Police were on the scene of a stabbing in the 300 block of Magnolia Road in Hellertown late Monday night. Read more

Updated

Emmaus Borough Council voted against changes to increase parking time limits from two to three hours in the borough's downtown business district. Read more

Updated

The Muhlenberg School Board reorganized its leadership and installed three new members at its meeting Monday night. Read more

Updated

A contentious school board meeting at Southern Lehigh took twists and turns before incoming members were able to take oath and new officers were elected. Read more

Updated

A conditional use remand hearing on a planned special care community will take place during the Whitehall Township Board of Commissioners' regular meeting next Monday night. Read more

Updated

A firefighter was hurt, and two residents were treated on scene. Read more

Updated

The district says the decision to build a new middle school at Mosser Woods is part of a broader district plan to make key facility improvements throughout ASD schools. Read more

Updated

The weekly trash pickups of 27,200 units will cost the city $5.93 million per year. Read more

Updated

The state's Department of Banking and Securities says scammers often use fake websites and names that sound similar to legitimate charities to try and fool people. Read more

Updated

The record number of coats collected in the WFMZ and Lehigh Valley Phantoms Coat Drive on Friday will go to various Salvation Army programs. Read more

Updated

"I think it's going to be our future for a while." Read more

Updated

(The Center Square) – Pennsylvania Republicans are denouncing the state Environmental Quality Board’s effort to join a Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative without a full review by the General Assembly, a move they say will cause drastic energy price increases and job losses. Read more

Updated

They'll be part of The Hive Residences apartment complex on the 100 block of North Seventh Street. Read more

Updated
Updated

The 3-foot-long alligator with an injured claw was found near shallow water when two fishermen first noticed him. Read more

Updated

The New Jersey Attorney General's Office says the recordings were released because of state policies established in 2019 that aim to promote transparent investigations of fatal police encounters. Read more

Updated

"You're keeping the money in the local economy instead of having it go to some company in a foreign country." Read more

Updated

The victim's father said his son suffered a fractured skull, and two broken bones in his lower right leg. Read more

Updated

The spill contaminated wetlands, tributaries and part of the 535-acre lake at Marsh Creek State Park in Chester County. Read more

Updated

The company said it has merged with Loch, Elsenbaumer, Newton & Co., which was based at 4905 W. Tilghman St., South Whitehall Township. Read more

Updated

The proposed Waldorf school would be for kindergarten through fifth grade.  Read more

Updated

The National Teacher of the Year Program through the Pa. Dept. of Education announced this year's Pennsylvania Teacher of the Year on Monday. Read more

Updated

Gerald Scott Ramos, 43, faces charges of first-degree murder, third-degree murder, and possessing an instrument of crime. Read more

Updated

(The Center Square) – A Pennsylvania government watchdog group is highlighting how the incestuous relationship between local government entities and lobbyists is costing taxpayers millions of dollars. The Commonwealth Foundation also is supporting legislation designed to put an end to the practice. Read more

US and World News

Updated

Burundi’s government says 38 prisoners have been killed in a fire Tuesday morning in Gitega, the country’s political capital. Vice President Prosper Bazombanza announced the deaths. More than 60 other people have been injured and the death toll could rise. The prison in Gitega is overcrowded with more than 1,500 inmates in cells designed to hold 400, according to local reports. Read more

Updated

Omicron cases have been confirmed in at least nine African countries, with some officials reporting that initial cases appear to be mild. Countries reporting omicron include: Botswana, Ghana, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe. South Africa remains the epicenter of the omicron outbreak, with experts saying that the overwhelming majority of its thousands of new cases per day are of the new variant. In East Africa, Uganda reported its first seven cases of omicron on Tuesday. Uganda's Minister of Health Jane Ruth Aceng said all of the seven travelers have mild symptoms. Read more

Updated

The U.S. trade deficit narrowed to $67.1 billion in October, the lowest in six months, after hitting a record high in September. A big rebound in exports helped to offset a much smaller rise in imports. The October deficit was 17.6% below the September record of $81.4 billion, the Commerce Department reported Tuesday. It was the smallest monthly deficit since a $66.2 billion imbalance in April. Analysts viewed the strong rise in exports as evidence that global supply chains were beginning to unsnarl and said smaller deficits this quarter could give a solid boost to overall U.S. economic growth. In October, exports rose 8.1% to $223.6 billion while imports were up a much smaller 0.9% to $290.7 billion.  Read more

Updated

Spain’s health ministry has given the go-ahead for children between ages 5 and 11 to be vaccinated against COVID-19. The decision Tuesday comes amid a rise in coronavirus infections. The Spanish rollout is due to begin Dec. 15. That’s two days after the first of 3.2 million child vaccines arrive in Spain. Neighboring Portugal is expected to follow suit. Austria has been inoculating children since the European Union’s drug regulator on Nov. 25 authorized Pfizer’s coronavirus vaccine for use on that age group. Greece will also begin on Dec. 15 and Italy will start on Dec. 16, among others. Read more

Updated

Stocks are off to a solid start on Wall Street Tuesday as investors continue to wager that the new variant of the COVID-19 virus won't pose a big threat to the economy. The S&P 500 rose 1.4% in the first few minutes of trading, adding to its gains from a day earlier. The tech-heavy Nasdaq rose 2%, and small-company stocks also posted gains. Safe-play sectors like utilities lagged the rest of the market. Treasury yields rose and crude oil prices climbed about 3%. European markets were also solidly higher, and Asian markets closed higher overnight.  Read more

Updated

Michigan’s attorney general says her office won’t be the agency to conduct a planned third-party investigation into the events at Oxford High School that occurred before last week’s school shooting that left four students dead. Oxford Community Schools Superintendent Tim Throne has said a third party will investigate. Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel had offered that her office could conduct the investigation, but she said in statement late Monday that the district declined her offer. Nessel has said, however, that she could still investigate. The Associated Press sent a message seeking comment from the district. Ethan Crumbley has been charged as an adult with murder, terrorism and other crimes in the Nov. 30 attack. His parents face involuntary manslaughter charges. Read more

Updated

Ukrainian and Western officials are worried about a Russian military buildup near Ukraine. They fear it could signal plans by Moscow to invade its ex-Soviet neighbor. Russia annexed Ukraine’s Crimean Peninsula in 2014 after the country’s Moscow-friendly president was driven from power by mass protests. Russia also cast its weight behind a separatist insurgency in Ukraine’s east. Russia rejects allegations of having aggressive intentions as part of a Western smear campaign. It’s unclear whether the Russian troop concentration heralds an imminent attack or represents an attempt to persuade the U.S. and its NATO allies to refrain from sending soldiers and weapons to Ukraine and drop plans for its eventual integration into NATO. Read more

Updated

Poland is introducing mandatory vaccination by March 1 for teachers, medical workers and uniformed security workers like police, the military, firefighters and security guards.  Health Minister Adam Niedzielski said Tuesday that after March 1 vaccination will be a condition for performing jobs in these sectors. He said amid a continuing high level of daily new infections, Poland is following in the footsteps of Germany and Austria in requiring vaccination from these three professional groups. He said starting Dec. 15, discos and nightclubs will be closed and guests at hotels, restaurants, eateries, theaters and churches will be reduced to 30% capacity from the current 50%. Poland is seeing about 20,000 new COVID-19 infections a day.   Read more

Thousands of Airbnb hosts have agreed to house refugees as part of the online lodging marketplace’s philanthropic program to provide emergency temporary housing to those who need it. It’s a program so successful it is seen as a model for those working to resettle refugees and has become a core mission of Airbnb.org, the nonprofit that celebrates its first anniversary Tuesday. In its first year, Airbnb.org helped provide more than 100,000 first responders with housing during the pandemic to avoid worries about spreading COVID-19 to their families. In recent months, the nonprofit has worked to resettle more than 7,400 Afghan refugees following the Taliban takeover of the country and has pledged to resettle more than 12,500 more. Read more

A 67-year-old man who has admitted to removing the testicles of several men at their request must serve eight years and six months in prison. German news agency dpa reports that a Munich regional court convicted the defendant on Tuesday of aggravated, dangerous and simple assault. The accused electrician, whose name was not released for privacy reasons, had admitted to offering “castrations” on sado-masochistic websites and several men paid him money for torturing them and removing their testicles. During the trial, the man had told the court that he performing these operations on his kitchen table in the town of Markt Schwaben, telling his victims that he was a trained medical professional. Read more

Updated

Workshops where non-professionals with a bug for fixing things can share equipment and experience with each other as well as the less handy are held on a regular basis in Denmark. The non-profit Repair Café Denmark stages up to 15 weekly “repair cafes” where volunteer repairers disassemble and diagnose an assortment of inoperable electronics for free. They and their customers are each doing their part for the environment one broken blender or laptop at a time. The Danish events are part of an international movement calling for the “right to repair” in response to the expense and environmental cost of personal electronics and appliances becoming obsolete within a few years.  Read more

Updated

A whistleblower has alleged that Britain’s Foreign Office abandoned many of the nation’s allies in Afghanistan and left them to the mercy of the Taliban during the fall of the capital, Kabul, because of a dysfunctional and arbitrary evacuation effort. In devastating evidence to a parliamentary committee, Raphael Marshall said thousands of pleas for help via email were unread between Aug. 21 and Aug. 25. The former Foreign Office employee estimated that only 5% of Afghan nationals who applied to flee under one U.K. program received help. He said that he was the only person monitoring the inbox at one point. Read more

Updated

Carmaker Stellantis has announced a strategy to embed AI-enabled software in 34 million vehicles across its 14 brands. It hopes the tech upgrade will help it bring in 20 billion euros  in annual revenue by 2030. CEO Carlos Tavares on Tuesday heralded the move as part of a strategy that would transform the car company into a “sustainable mobility tech company,” with business growth coming from tied to the internet. That includes using voice commands to activate navigation, make payments and order products online. The company is expanding key partnerships with BMW on partially automated driving, iPhone manufacturer Foxconn on customized cockpits and Waymo to push autonomous driving work into light commercial vehicle delivery fleets. Read more

Updated

As Jussie Smollett fights criminal charges that he lied to Chicago police about being the victim of an anti-gay, racist attack, his supporters are also working on a broader strategy: Ensuring the 39-year-old emerges from the scandal with his reputation and career intact, whatever the outcome of the trial. The charges against Smollett are low-level felonies and carry a possible sentence of three years in prison, though legal experts say that if convicted he’s most likely to get probation and be ordered to perform community service. The impact on his livelihood could be far more serious. His team has brought supporters before TV cameras to back Smollett, and promoted a film he wrote, directed and produced. Read more

Updated

American Airlines CEO Doug Parker will retire next March and be replaced by the airline's current president, Robert Isom. American said Tuesday that Parker will remain chairman. Isom had been the heir apparent for several years at the airline, which is based in Fort Worth, Texas. Parker has spent two decades as an airline CEO since becoming the head of America West Airlines just days before the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks. In 2005, Parker engineered a merger with larger US Airways, and he repeated the same strategy in December 2013 with American, which was just emerging from bankruptcy protection. Read more

Updated

The European Union drug regulator has given its backing to mixing different types of vaccines in initial vaccination and booster campaigns to battle the coronavirus. The European Medicines Agency said in a statement Tuesday that using different types of vaccines together known as heterologous vaccination can provide protection against COVID-19. The announcement comes as much of Europe is facing rising infection and hospital rates and concerns about the new omicron variant. The EMA along with the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control said that a mix-and-match strategy could give nations more options in vaccination campaigns as much of the continent faces rising infection and hospitalization rates. Read more

Updated

President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden have marked the 80th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor with a visit to the World War II Memorial in Washington. The Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor and other locations in Hawaii killed 2,403 service members and civilians and was a defining moment leading to U.S. entry into the war. Joe Biden touched a wreath at the memorial and saluted on Tuesday. The first lady laid a bouquet honoring her father, a Navy signalman in the war. In a White House proclamation last week recognizing National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, the president thanked "the Greatest Generation." Read more

Updated

Instagram has launched a feature that urges teenagers to take breaks from the photo-sharing platform and announced other tools aimed at protecting young users from harmful content on the Facebook-owned service. An Instagram blog post says the previously announced “Take A Break” feature encourages teens to stop scrolling if they have been on the social media platform for a while. It rolled out to the U.S., United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, New Zealand and Australia on Tuesday. It’s one of the efforts that Facebook, renamed to Meta Platforms, has touted as it weathers backlash about not doing enough to rein in harmful content and faces new legislation looking to impose restrictions on tech giants. Read more

Updated

An eight-year project to carefully repeat early but influential lab experiments in cancer research has reached a conclusion. About half the scientific claims didn’t hold up. The Reproducibility Project reported its results Tuesday. The team repeated 50 experiments from cancer biology papers published from 2010 to 2012 in major journals. They recreated experiments with mice and test tubes, sticking as close to original protocols as possible. Yet, overall, 54% of the original findings failed to measure up to their tests. The researchers say their work reflects on shortcomings early in the scientific process, not with established treatments, which are more rigorously tested. Read more

Updated

The World Health Organization’s office for Europe says that children in the 5 to 14 age group now account for the highest rates of reported COVID-19 infection in the region. WHO Europe regional director Dr. Hans Kluge also argued Tuesday that vaccine mandates should be “an absolute last resort” and said that COVID-19 deaths remain “significantly below previous peaks.” But he said that coronavirus cases and deaths have more than doubled in the last two months in the 53-country region stretching to central Asia. He stressed the continued threat from the widespread delta variant. And he noted the new omicron variant has so far accounted for 432 confirmed cases in 21 countries in the region. Read more

A small clay tablet dating back 3,500 years and bearing a portion of the Epic of Gilgamesh that was looted from an Iraqi museum during the 1991 Gulf War has returned to Iraq. It was handed over at a ceremony Tuesday in the presence of UNESCO officials. It's one of the world’s oldest surviving works of literature and one of the oldest religious texts. Officials believe it was illegally imported into the United States in 2003, then sold to Hobby Lobby and eventually put on display in its Museum of the Bible in Washington. A federal judge in New York approved the forfeiture of the tablet in July this year. Read more

Updated

President Joe Biden is ready to warn Vladimir Putin during a video call that Russia will face economy-jarring sanctions if it invades neighboring Ukraine. The U.S. president is seeking a diplomatic solution to deal with the tens of thousands of Russian troops massed near the Ukraine border. White House officials say Biden will make clear Tuesday that his administration is prepared to exact new sanctions against the Kremlin that would have huge costs for the Russian economy. Putin is expected to demand guarantees from Biden that the NATO military alliance will never expand to include Ukraine. Biden has said he won't accept such “red lines.” Read more

Updated

It’s former Officer Kim Potter who’s on trial for the killing of Daunte Wright. But the trial in the same courtroom where ex-cop Derek Chauvin was convicted earlier this year of killing George Floyd is casting its shadow over the proceedings. During jury selection last week, there was little explicit mention of Chauvin's murder trial or of Floyd's death, which sparked outrage over police brutality in the U.S. But with opening statements set for Wednesday, there are reminders everywhere. They range from some of the same prosecutors who tried Chauvin to potential jurors being asked about their fears of delivering an unpopular verdict. Read more

The Mississippi Aquarium is treating 40 endangered sea turtles that stranded in Massachustts when the water cooled down so quickly they couldn't swim away. Vice president of veterinary services Alexa Delaune said Monday that the Kemp's ridley turtles all are pretty small and most have symptoms of pneumonia. Mississippi Aquarium spokesman Jeff Clark says the New England Aquarium ran out of room and asked if Mississippi could take them. Kemp's ridley turtles are the smallest and most endangered of the species found in U.S. waters. They were flown to Gulfport on Friday by a volunteer pilot group called Turtles Fly Too.  Read more

Updated

China has accused the United States of violating the Olympic spirit after the Biden administration announced a diplomatic boycott of the Beijing Winter Games over human rights concerns. Rights groups have pushed for a full-blown boycott of the Games, accusing China of rights abuses against ethnic minorities. The U.S. decision falls short of those calls but comes at an exceptionally turbulent time for relations between the powerhouse nations. It was met with a barrage of criticism from China on Tuesday. A Foreign Ministry spokesperson said the U.S. is attempting to interfere with the Beijing Games “out of ideological prejudice and based on lies and rumors.” Read more

Updated

The Beijing Winter Olympics open in just under two months and are now the target of a diplomatic boycott by the United States with others likely to follow. So how did Beijing land the Winter Olympics so soon after it was host to the Summer Olympics in 2008? It will become the first city in Olympic history to host both the Winter and Summer Games. The situation arose when six European cities withdrew bids — or did not follow through — because of failed referendums or fears over costs. The International Olympic Committee had only two candidates — Beijing and Almaty, Kazakhstan, when voting took place in 2015 in Kuala, Lumpur, Malaysia. Read more

A Dutch appeals court has upheld a lower court’s decision to throw out a civil case against Israel’s defense minister and another former senior military officer over their roles in a deadly 2014 airstrike. The Hague District Court ruled in January 2020 that the case against Israeli Defense Minister Benny Gantz and former air force commander Amir Eshel couldn't proceed because the men have “functional immunity from jurisdiction.” The Hague court of appeal said Tuesday that the lower court was right to rule that Gantz and Eshel had immunity because they were carrying out Israeli government policies. The case was brought by Ismail Ziada. He lost six members of his family in the airstrike during the 2014 Gaza conflict. Read more

While many European theaters remain closed due to the pandemic, the famed Teatro alla Scala in Milan opens its new season Tuesday with the gala premiere of Verdi’s “Macbeth” to a fully seated house. La Scala resumed performances at full capacity in September, but there remain considerations for the pandemic: Attendees must be vaccinated or recently recovered to attend performances in Italy under new government regulations launched this week for the holiday season.  After last year’s televised-only premier, the in-person season opener was a positive signal for one of the world’s top opera houses, even as live performances elsewhere continued to suffer as the virus made a winter resurgence. Read more

Updated

Global investors are watching nervously as one of China’s biggest real estate developers tries to avoid a default on its $310 billion mountain of debt. Evergrande Group, which is scrambling to turn assets into cash, rattled financial markets Friday when it warned it might run out of money. It said missing a payment on bonds or other debts might trigger an avalanche of demands to pay other debts immediately. Economists say ruling Communist Party can keep credit markets functioning but won’t bail out Evergrande, which the central bank accused of borrowing recklessly. They say that would be the wrong signal at a time when Beijing is trying to force companies to reduce dangerously high debt loads. Read more

Updated

China has reported its exports rose by double digits in November but growth declined, while imports accelerated in a sign of stronger domestic demand. Customs data showed exports rose 21.4% over a year earlier to $325.5 billion, decelerating from October’s 27.1% growth. Imports surged 31.7% to $253.8 billion, up from the previous month’s 20.6% rate. China’s exports have been boosted by foreign demand at a time when other global competitors are hampered by anti-coronavirus controls. Stronger imports suggest consumer and other demand is rebounding after economic growth sank to an unexpectedly low 4.9% over a year ago in the latest quarter. Read more