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A mostly white jury is nearly set for the trial of a suburban Minneapolis police officer charged in Daunte Wright’s shooting death. Twelve panelists have been seated, with just two more needed to serve as alternates ahead of next Wednesday's opening statements. Former Brooklyn Center Officer Kim Potter is charged with manslaughter in the death of Wright, a 20-year-old Black motorist. She says she meant to use her Taser to stop Wright after he pulled away from officers who were trying to arrest him during a traffic stop, but that she drew her handgun instead. Nine of the 12 jurors — who will deliberate in the case unless either of two alternates are needed — are white.

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A judge has ordered nine lawyers allied with former President Donald Trump to pay Detroit and Michigan a total of $175,000 in sanctions for abusing the court system with a sham lawsuit challenging the 2020 election results. The money, which must be paid within 30 days, will cover the legal costs of defending against the suit, which were more than $153,000 for the city and nearly $22,000 for the state. U.S. District Judge Linda Parker, who agreed to impose sanctions in August, rejected most of the attorneys’ objections to Detroit’s proposed award, but she did reduce it by about $29,000. Among the sanctioned lawyers were Sidney Powell and L. Lin Wood.

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The jury for the trial of a suburban Minneapolis police officer charged in Daunte Wright’s shooting death is nearly complete. Twelve panelists have been seated, with just two more needed to serve as alternates ahead of next Wednesday's opening statements. Former Brooklyn Center Officer Kim Potter is charged with manslaughter in the death of Wright, a 20-year-old Black motorist. She says she meant to use her Taser to stop Wright after he pulled away from officers who were trying to arrest him during a traffic stop, but that she drew her handgun instead. Nine of the 12 jurors — who will deliberate in the case unless either of two alternates are needed — are white.

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A federal appeals court has signaled it might be willing to let another restrictive abortion ban take effect, this one in Tennessee. Earlier this year, a panel of the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals temporarily halted a Tennessee law banning abortion once cardiac activity is detected in an embryo — at around six weeks. Bu  late Wednesday, the appeals court said it would vacate that ruling and schedule a rehearing before the full court. The move marked another rapid turn in ongoing court battles over abortion access. It came just hours after the U.S. Supreme Court concluded historic arguments over abortion.

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The Duchess of Sussex has won the latest stage in her long-running privacy lawsuit against a British newspaper publisher over its publication of parts of a letter she wrote to her estranged father. The Court of Appeal in London upheld a High Court ruling in February that the publisher of The Mail on Sunday and MailOnline website unlawfully breached the former Meghan Markle’s privacy by reproducing the handwritten letter she wrote to her father, Thomas Markle, after she married Prince Harry in 2018. Associated Newspapers challenged that decision at the Court of Appeal but lost Thursday. In a statement, Meghan, 40, condemned the publisher and said the ruling was a victory "for anyone who has ever felt scared to stand up for what’s right.”

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A jury in Nevada has found one of the nation’s largest health insurers liable for underpaying millions of dollars to out-of-network emergency medical providers in what plaintiffs’ attorneys argued was a systematic bid to boost company profits. The state court jury in Las Vegas awarded more than $2 million in damages to plaintiffs TeamHealth and others. The jury will return next week to decide punitive damages against defendants including United Healthcare Insurance Co. A spokesman said Wednesday the company is reviewing implications of the verdict. It was reached Monday. The breach-of-contract lawsuit focused on what emergency room care providers who aren't covered by a patient’s insurance receive for treating patients who can't by law be turned away.

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A 15-year-old boy has been charged with murder and terrorism for a shooting that killed four fellow students and injured others at a Michigan high school. Authorities on Wednesday revealed that his parents were summoned just a few hours before the bloodshed. No motive was offered by Oakland County authorities, a day after violence at Oxford High School. But sheriff’s Lt. Tim Willis told a judge that Ethan Crumbley recorded a video the night before the violence in which he discussed killing students. Crumbley is charged as an adult with murder, attempted murder, terrorism causing death and gun crimes. A judge ordered him held without bond and transferred to jail from a juvenile facility.

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A panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has upheld California's ban on high-capacity magazines in a split decision that may be headed for the U.S. Supreme Court. The San Francisco-based panel acted Tuesday after two appellate judges on the court last year ruled the state’s ban on magazines holding more than 10 bullets violates the U.S. Constitution’s protection of the right to bear firearms. But in the 7-4 decision, the 9th Circuit reasoned that the law doesn't outlaw any weapon and interferes only minimally with the right of self defense. The California Rifle & Pistol Association filed the lawsuit challenging the law. It says it will appeal to the Supreme Court.

A divided Wisconsin Supreme Court has sided with Republicans in a redistricting ruling that will lay the groundwork for drawing new political boundary lines. In a 4-3 ruling Tuesday, the court’s conservative majority said it will make as few changes as possible to the current maps drawn by Republicans and enacted a decade ago. Democrats and others have argued that those maps are so heavily skewed in favor of Republicans the new legislative and congressional maps should be drawn from scratch. But the Supreme Court said changes to the current maps should be limited to population shifts made apparent by the once-a-decade census.