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Police are investigating a bus explosion that killed at least two people in central Uganda. The explosion on the bus took place as the vehicle was traveling from Kampala, the capital, to the western part of Uganda on Monday. Police said they dispatched bomb experts to the scene. It was the East African country's second blast in less than 48 hours. An explosion at an eatery in a busy Kampala suburb killed one person on Saturday night. The Islamic State group has claimed responsibility for that attack, saying it detonated an explosive device at the eatery allegedly “frequented by elements and spies” with Uganda’s government. 

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The shooting death of a cinematographer on the set of the set of the Alec Baldwin movie “Rust” is a reminder of the dangers that can exist on film and television sets. As authorities investigate why a crew member handed Baldwin a loaded gun instead of one safe to use, industry leaders will look for ways to avoid similar tragedies. On-set fatalities have led to safety reforms in the past. A helicopter crash that killed actor Vic Morrow and two children on the 1982 set of “Twilight Zone: The Movie” led to new rules for filming with choppers. Gun safety rules were adopted after actor Brandon Lee was fatally shot while filming “The Crow” in 1993.

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Court records show that an assistant director unwittingly handed Alec Baldwin a loaded weapon and told him it was safe to use in the moments before the actor fatally shot a cinematographer. The assistant director referred to the gun as “cold," according to a search warrant filed Friday in a Santa Fe, New Mexico, court. Instead, the gun was loaded with live rounds. When Baldwin pulled the trigger Thursday on the set of a Western, he killed 42-year-old cinematographer Halyna Hutchins. The sheriff’s office obtained the warrant so investigators could document the scene where the shooting took place. They sought to examine Baldwin’s blood-stained costume for the film “Rust."

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A New York jury has convicted a former associate of Rudy Giuliani of charges that he made illegal campaign contributions to influence U.S. politicians and advance his business interests. The verdict convicting him on all six counts was returned Friday in Manhattan federal court. Lev Parnas was on trial for more than two weeks as prosecutors accused him of using other people’s money to pose as a powerful political broker and cozy up to some of the nation’s star Republican political figures. The case had drawn interest because Parnas had been involved in Giuliani’s efforts to get Ukrainian officials to investigate Joe Biden’s son. Giuliani wasn’t charged in the case.

A woman who was the victim of a serial killer and for the last 37 years was only known as Horseshoe Harriet has been identified through a DNA match. The Alaska Bureau of Investigations' cold case unit on Friday said 19-year-old Robin Pelkey was one of at least 12 victims of notorious Alaska serial killer Robert Hansen. She had been living on the streets of Anchorage when she disappeared in the early 1980s. Hansen told investigators he abducted her from downtown Anchorage, flew her to Horseshoe Lake immediately north of town and murdered her. He didn't know her name and left her there. The body was found in 1984, and identified last month through genetic genealogy.

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Now that the decomposed remains of Brian Laundrie have been found, where does the investigation into the strangling of his girlfriend, Gabby Petito, go from here? Petito, 22, was discovered slain last month on the edge of Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming, one place the couple had visited during a cross-country van trip that ended with Laundrie mysteriously returning home alone. Laundrie, named a “person of interest” in the case, was missing for a month before his skeletal remains were found Wednesday in a nature park. Experts say it's difficult but not impossible to prove whether Laundrie killed Petito. Another issue is whether his parents bear liability for possibly shielding him from investigators.

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Amnesty International is calling for an independent parliamentary inquiry into COVID-19 deaths in Italian nursing homes and reports of retaliation against nursing home staff who spoke out about unsafe conditions there. Amnesty based its findings on interviews with 34 health care workers, as well as union leaders and lawyers. The human rights watchdog said Friday that a third of the workers “raised concerns about a climate of fear and retaliation in their workplace." Italy’s nursing homes, like those elsewhere in Europe, the U.S. and beyond, saw a major share of COVID-19 deaths. Prosecutors in dozens of jurisdictions have opened criminal investigations, though the biggest one, involving a Milan facility, was recently shelved with no charges filed.

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A prop firearm discharged by veteran actor Alec Baldwin, who is producing and starring in a Western movie, killed his director of photography and injured the director Thursday at the movie set outside Santa Fe, authorities said. The Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office says 42-year-old Halyna Hutchins, director of photography for the movie “Rust,” and 48-year-old director Joel Souza were shot. Authorities say Hutchins was airlifted to University of New Mexico Hospital where she was pronounced dead by medical personnel. Souza was taken by ambulance to Christus St. Vincent Regional Medical Center for treatment of his injuries. Production has been halted on the film.

The House has voted to hold Steve Bannon, a longtime ally and aide to former President Donald Trump, in contempt of Congress after he defied a subpoena from the committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection. Now the U.S. attorney's office must decide whether to prosecute. The congressional committee has vowed to move swiftly and forcefully to punish anyone who won’t cooperate with the probe. The Thursday vote was mostly along party lines, with almost all Republicans voting against the contempt measure. The partisan debate is emblematic of the raw tensions that are still lingering in Congress nine months after the Capitol attack.

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Southern California harbor patrol boats picked up reports of a possible fuel spill off the coast on a marine radio emergency channel about an hour before the U.S. Coast Guard said it heard about oil on the water. An Orange County sheriff's department spokeswoman says harbor patrol boats off the coast of Huntington Beach picked up radio chatter among local vessels about an oily sheen and smell on Oct. 1 and went to check on it but found nothing. A Coast Guard official says the agency heard a radio report of a possible spill about an hour later. The accounts raise new questions about how agencies learned about the spill.