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Authorities say two people were killed and at least 30 others wounded in mass shootings overnight in three states. The shootings Friday night and early Saturday further stoked concerns a spike in U.S. gun violence during the coronavirus pandemic could continue into summer amid an easing of COVID-19 restrictions. Authorities said one of two suspects was arrested Saturday in the shooting in the Texas capital of Austin, but none in the Chicago or Savannah, Georgia, gunfire.  James Alan Fox, a criminologist and professor at Northeastern University, says a blend of people starting to get out, warmer weather, a high level of divisiveness, and a proliferation of guns make for “a potentially deadly mix.”

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Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro has led thousands of motorcyclist supporters through the streets of Sao Paulo — and got hit with a fine for failure to wear a mask, in violation of local pandemic restrictions. The conservative president waved to the crowd from his motorcycle and later from atop a sound truck, where helmeted but largely maskless backers cheered and chanted Saturday as he insisted that masks were useless for those already vaccinated. That's an assertion disputed by most public health experts. Sao Paulo’s state government press office said a fine would be imposed for violation of a mask requirement.

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Moscow’s mayor has ordered a week off for some workplaces and imposed restrictions on many businesses to fight coronavirus infections that have more than doubled in the past week. The national coronavirus taskforce reported 6,701 new confirmed cases on Saturday in Moscow, compared with 2,936 on June 6. Nationally, the daily tally has spiked by nearly half over the past week. Moscow Mayor Sergei Sobyanin ordered enterprises that do not normally work on weekends to remain closed for the next week while continuing to pay employees. In addition, food courts and children’s play areas in shopping centers are to close for a week and restaurants and bars must limit their late-night service to takeout.

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British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has hinted that the next planned relaxation of coronavirus restrictions in England will be delayed as a result of the spread of the delta variant first identified in India. On the sidelines of the Group of Seven leaders’ summit in southwest England, Johnson conceded Saturday that he has grown more pessimistic about sanctioning the removal of legal limits on social contact on June 21. He is set to make an announcement Monday about the timetable. Removing limits on social contact would allow nightclubs to reopen, but the number of infections across the U.K. recently increased to daily levels not seen since February..

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With COVID-19 cases declining and vaccinations increasing, governors across the U.S. are wrestling with decisions about when to declare an end to the emergency declarations they have issued and reissued throughout the pandemic. More than a half-dozen states already have ended their coronavirus emergencies. That includes South Carolina and New Hampshire, where Republican governors ended their emergency orders this past week. More states could join that list soon. Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker says his emergency declaration will come to an end Tuesday. Republicans generally are leading the push to end emergency orders, but some Democrats also are supporting such moves. 

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Saudi Arabia says this year’s hajj pilgrimage will be limited to no more than 60,000 people, all of them from within the kingdom, due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. The kingdom made the announcement Saturday on its state-run Saudi Press Agency. It cited the Ministry of Hajj and Umrah for making the decision. In last year’s hajj, as few as 1,000 people already residing in Saudi Arabia were selected to take part in the hajj. Two-thirds were foreign residents from among the 160 different nationalities that would have normally been represented at the hajj. One-third were Saudi security personnel and medical staff.

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India’s economy was on the cusp of recovery when a new wave of infections swept the country, infecting millions, killing hundreds of thousands and forcing others to stay home. Cases are now tapering off, but many Indians face drastically worse prospects: salaried jobs are vanishing, incomes are dropping and inequality is on the rise. Experts say decades of progress in alleviating poverty are imperiled, and getting growth back on track hinges on the fate of the country’s diverse and sprawling middle class. Millions of salaried workers and small business people are struggling to hold onto their hard-earned gains and economists say the recovery may not be as robust for them as for elsewhere in the world. 

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Top U.S. and Chinese diplomats appear to have had another sharply worded exchange, with Beijing saying it told the U.S. to cease interfering in its internal affairs and accusing it of politicizing the search for the origin of the COVID-19 pandemic. Senior Chinese foreign policy adviser Yang Jiechi and Secretary of State Antony Blinken held a phone call Friday that revealed wide divisions in a number of contentious areas including the curtailing of freedoms in Hong Kong and the mass detention of Muslims in the northwestern Xinjiang region. Yang said China was “gravely concerned" over what he called “absurd" stories that the virus escaped from a lab in the central Chinese city of Wuhan, where cases were first discovered.