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The endangered Sumatran Titan arum, a giant foul-smelling blossom also known as the corpse flower, has gone into a rare, quick bloom at a botanical garden in Warsaw. The event drew crowds who waited for hours in a cold wind to see it only briefly. The extraordinary flower that emits a dead-body odor bloomed Sunday. It was already withering Monday. Those who wanted to dodge its smell could watch the live video from the Warsaw University Botanical Gardens. Know also as Amorphophallus titanum, it only grows in the rainforests of Sumatra, but it is endangered there due to deforestation. It's first known blooming outside Sumatra was in 1889 at London's Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew.  

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Britain's Queen Elizabeth II receives a Duke of Edinburgh rose, given to her by Keith Weed, President of the Royal Horticultural Society, at Windsor Castle, England, Wednesday, June 9, 2021. The newly bred deep pink commemorative rose has officially been named in memory of the late Prince Philip Duke of Edinburgh. A royalty from the sale of each rose will go to The Duke of Edinburgh's Award Living Legacy Fund to support young people taking part in the Duke of Edinburgh Award scheme. (Steve Parsons/Pool via AP)

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Britain's Queen Elizabeth II receives a Duke of Edinburgh rose, given to her by Keith Weed, President of the Royal Horticultural Society, at Windsor Castle, England, Wednesday, June 9, 2021. The newly bred deep pink commemorative rose has officially been named in memory of the late Prince Philip Duke of Edinburgh. A royalty from the sale of each rose will go to The Duke of Edinburgh's Award Living Legacy Fund to support young people taking part in the Duke of Edinburgh Award scheme. (Steve Parsons/Pool via AP)

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Britain's Queen Elizabeth II looks at flower beds after receiving a Duke of Edinburgh rose, given to her by Keith Weed, centre, President of the Royal Horticultural Society, at Windsor Castle, England, Wednesday June 9, 2021. The newly bred deep pink commemorative rose has officially been named in memory of the late Prince Philip Duke of Edinburgh. A royalty from the sale of each rose will go to The Duke of Edinburgh's Award Living Legacy Fund to support young people taking part in the Duke of Edinburgh Award scheme. (Steve Parsons/Pool via AP)

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Britain's Queen Elizabeth II receives a Duke of Edinburgh rose, given to her by Keith Weed, President of the Royal Horticultural Society, at Windsor Castle, England, Wednesday June 9, 2021. The newly bred deep pink commemorative rose has officially been named in memory of the late Prince Philip Duke of Edinburgh. A royalty from the sale of each rose will go to The Duke of Edinburgh's Award Living Legacy Fund to support young people taking part in the Duke of Edinburgh Award scheme. (Steve Parsons/Pool via AP)

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Britain's Queen Elizabeth II receives a Duke of Edinburgh rose, with Keith Weed, centre, President of the Royal Horticultural Society, at Windsor Castle, England, Wednesday June 9, 2021. The newly bred deep pink commemorative rose has officially been named in memory of the late Prince Philip Duke of Edinburgh. A royalty from the sale of each rose will go to The Duke of Edinburgh's Award Living Legacy Fund to support young people taking part in the Duke of Edinburgh Award scheme. (Steve Parsons/Pool via AP)