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 President Joe Biden’s vaccination campaign hit a snag when federal regulators recommended a “pause” in administering Johnson & Johnson shots. But the White House is holding out the move as a validation of the president’s measured approach throughout the rollout. Biden administration officials pointed to the action by the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as proof that they’re putting safety first. There's concern about the effect on those Americans who are already leery of all virus vaccines, but Biden said there is enough that's 100 percent safe for "every single solitary American.”  

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Muslims in many parts of the world are marking the start of Ramadan as coronavirus cases spike in some countries. That means restrictions on signature features of the holy month that started Tuesday, such as large evening feasts and lengthy prayers in mosques. Unlike last year, however, mosques have reopened for Ramadan prayers as vaccine rollouts continue in Muslim-majority nations like Indonesia. Clerics have issued assurances the vaccine does not break one's daytime fast. In other countries, Muslims will have to once again perform Ramadan with nighttime curfews in place. 

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France has suspended all flights between Brazil and France amid concerns over coronavirus variants. Prime Minister Jean Castex made the announcement Tuesday in parliament. He said: “We note that the situation is getting worse and so we have decided to suspend all flights between Brazil and France until further notice.” France has had 5.1 million coronavirus cases since the pandemic began, the highest number in Europe, and has seen over 99,000 COVID-19 patients die. It is struggling with another surge of infections that threaten to overwhelm its hospitals. The transport minister says as few as 50 people per day are flying into Paris’ main airport from Brazil now, down from 50,000 per week before the pandemic.

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While most Americans have weathered the pandemic financially, about 38 million say they are worse off now than before the outbreak began in the U.S. Overall, 55% of Americans say their financial circumstances are about the same now as a year ago, and 30% say their finances have improved. That's according to a new poll from Impact Genome and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. But 15% say they are worse off. The problem is more pronounced at lower-income levels. Twenty-nine percent of those living below the federal poverty level say their personal finances worsened in the past year. 

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Britain has begun offering coronavirus vaccinations to anyone over 45 after hitting its target of giving at least one dose to everyone over 50 by the middle of April. The government said all residents over 50, health care workers and people with serious medical conditions had been offered a jab, and about 95% of them received one. As a result, the government launched the second phase of its inoculation campaign on Tuesday by expanding eligibility to people ages 45 to 49. Despite the good news, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson warned that the U.K. would inevitably see “more hospitalization and deaths” as it emerges from lockdown.