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The new House panel investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection has opened its first hearing. Democrats are starting with a focus on the law enforcement officers who were attacked and beaten as the rioters broke into the building. It's an effort to put a human face on the violence of the day. The police officers who are testifying Tuesday endured some of the worst of the brutality. The panel’s first hearing comes as partisan tensions have only worsened since the insurrection. Many Republicans have played down or outright denied the violence that occurred and denounced the Democratic-led investigation as politically motivated.

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Senators and the White House are locked in intense negotiations to salvage a bipartisan infrastructure deal. Pressure is mounting on all sides to wrap up talks and show progress on President Joe Biden’s top priority. Despite weeks of closed-door discussions, senators from the bipartisan group blew past a Monday deadline set for agreement on the nearly $1 trillion package. Instead they've run into disagreements over how much money should go to public transit and water projects. But labor issues are also a flashpoint, as is tapping COVID-19 funds to help pay for the package. Biden says he remains optimistic.  

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Senators and the White House are locked in intense negotiations to salvage a bipartisan infrastructure deal. Pressure is mounting on all sides to wrap up talks and show progress on President Joe Biden’s top priority. Despite weeks of closed-door discussions, senators from the bipartisan group blew past a Monday deadline set for agreement on the nearly $1 trillion package. Instead they've run into disagreements over how much money should go to public transit and water projects. But labor issues are also a flashpoint, as is tapping COVID-19 funds to help pay for the package. Biden says he remains optimistic.  

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Mississippi Rep. Bennie Thompson is about to pick up his duties as chairman of a select committee to investigate the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection. As the longtime chairman of the Homeland Security Committee, the Democrat is familiar with being in a leadership role. But the Jan. 6 panel will be a new challenge. Most House Republicans remain loyal to former President Donald Trump, and Congress is deeply split over the deadly insurrection. On Tuesday, the panel will hold its first hearing with police officers who battled the attackers. Thompson's stewardship will be a test unlike any other as he tries to untangle the events of that day. 

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Washington state is embarking on a massive experiment in police reform and accountability following the racial justice protests that erupted after George Floyd’s murder last year, with nearly a dozen laws that took effect Sunday. But law enforcement officials remain uncertain about what they require, leading to discrepancies around the state in how officers might respond — or not respond — to certain situations, including active crime scenes and mental health crises. The legislation's many provisions include bans on chokeholds, neck restraints and no-knock warrants. They require officers to intervene if their colleagues use excessive force, and they establish a new state agency to investigate police killings.

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A new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds that 54% of Americans judge the economy to be in poor shape. That's compared with 45% who say conditions are good. The results point to the risks of inflation to President Joe Biden's agenda. Biden's $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package and the strong gains in jobs have not swayed public opinion much. The results suggest that inflation worries many Americans who filter their thoughts about the economy through their politics. About 6 in 10 Democrats call the economy good, while three-quarters of Republicans say conditions are poor.

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Lawmakers racing to seal a bipartisan infrastructure deal early this coming week are hitting a major roadblock over how much money should go to public transit. As discussions continued through the weekend, the group's lead Republican negotiator says both sides were “about 90% of the way there” on an agreement. Democrats want to see more of the money in the roughly $1 trillion infrastructure agreement go toward public transportation. Some senators are threatening to oppose the deal if it doesn't. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer has said he wants to pass a bipartisan package and an accompanying $3.5 trillion budget plan before the Senate's August recess. 

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has named a second Republican critic of Donald Trump, Rep. Adam Kinzinger, to a special committee investigating the Capitol riot. She's pledging that the Democratic-majority panel will “get to the truth.” The committee is set to hold its first meeting on Tuesday, hearing from police officers who battled the rioters on Jan. 6. House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy has said the GOP will not participate after Pelosi refused to accept the members he picked. Pelosi has already put Wyoming Republican Liz Cheney on the committee. Kinzinger says he “humbly accepted” the committee assignment, saying Americans need to know the truth on “how and why thousands showed up to attack our democracy.”

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Senate Democrats are raising new concerns about the thoroughness of the FBI’s background investigation into Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh after the FBI revealed that it had received thousands of tips and had provided “all relevant” ones to the White House counsel’s office. FBI Director Christopher Wray, responding to longstanding questions from Democrats, disclosed in a letter late last month that it had received more than 4,500 tips as it investigated the nominee’s past following his 2018 nomination by President Donald Trump. The process was the first time that the FBI had set up a tip line for a nominee undergoing Senate confirmation.

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Senators negotiating two colossal bills that would deliver more than $4 trillion for infrastructure, health care, environment and other initiatives keep insisting both bills will be fully paid for. But will they really? Democrats and Republicans have long relied on budget gimmicks to help finance their priorities. This budget gimmickry lets lawmakers claim they’re being fiscally responsible while inflicting little pain on voters and contributors with tax increases or spending cuts. Though there are some legitimate savings in the two emerging bills, it looks like lawmakers are getting ready to use smoke and mirrors again.