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When peace returns to Ukraine, many thousands of its combatants will likely return from the battlefields bearing psychological scars. Psychologists, veterans affairs officers and former soldiers are working to head off a potential mental health crisis when troops transition to civilian life. A mental health rehabilitation center for soldiers on the outskirts of Ukraine's capital, Kyiv, treats post-traumatic disorders with acupuncture, soothing sounds and other therapies. A former paratrooper who ran a half-marathon to raise awareness and funds for treatments says healthy-looking soldiers suffer inwardly. He worries about the risks of traumatized soldiers taking their own lives or turning guns on others.

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Colorado voters have passed a ballot initiative to decriminalize psychedelic mushrooms for people 21 and older and to create state-regulated centers where participants can experience the drug. Colorado becomes the second state after Oregon to establish a regulated system for substances like psilocybin and psilocin, the hallucinogens found in some mushrooms. Colorado’s initiative eventually will allow an advisory board to add other plant-based psychedelic drugs to the program. Proponents argued that the state’s current approach to mental health has failed and that naturally occurring psychedelics can treat depression, PTSD, anxiety and addiction. Critics said decriminalization would jeopardize public safety.

AP
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Colorado voters have passed a ballot initiative to decriminalize psychedelic mushrooms for people 21 and older and to create state-regulated centers where participants can experience the drug. Colorado becomes the second state after Oregon to establish a regulated system for substances like psilocybin and psilocin, the hallucinogens found in some mushrooms. Colorado’s initiative eventually will allow an advisory board to add other plant-based psychedelic drugs to the program. Proponents argued that the state’s current approach to mental health has failed and that naturally occurring psychedelics can treat depression, PTSD, anxiety and addiction. Critics said decriminalization would jeopardize public safety.

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A vote to determine whether Colorado will become the second state, after Oregon, to create a legalized system for the use of psychedelic mushrooms is too early to call. A ballot measure would decriminalize psychedelic mushrooms for those 21 and older and create state-regulated “healing centers” where participants can experience the drug under the supervision of a licensed “facilitator.” It also would allow an advisory board to eventually add other plant-based psychedelic drugs to the program. Supporters say psychedelics can treat depression, PTSD, anxiety, addiction and other conditions. Critics argue decriminalization will jeopardize public safety.

AP
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A vote to determine whether Colorado will become the second state, after Oregon, to create a legalized system for the use of psychedelic mushrooms is too early to call. A ballot measure would decriminalize psychedelic mushrooms for those 21 and older and create state-regulated “healing centers” where participants can experience the drug under the supervision of a licensed “facilitator.” It also would allow an advisory board to eventually add other plant-based psychedelic drugs to the program. Supporters say psychedelics can treat depression, PTSD, anxiety, addiction and other conditions. Critics argue decriminalization will jeopardize public safety.

AP

Colorado voters are set to decide whether to decriminalize psychedelic mushrooms for those 21 and older and create state-regulated “healing centers” where participants can experience the drug. If the ballot initiative passes, the state will join Oregon in establishing a regulated system for substances like psilocybin and psilocin, the hallucinogens found in some mushrooms. Colorado’s initiative would allow an advisory board in 2026 to add other plant-based psychedelic drugs to the program. Proponents argue the current approach to mental health has failed and psychedelics can treat depression, PTSD, anxiety, addiction and other conditions. Critics note the Food and Drug Administration hasn't approved them as medicine. They also say decriminalization will jeopardize public safety.

AP
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A former legislator has told an Oregon House committee that he was bullied by then-House Speaker Tina Kotek, the Democratic candidate for governor, to the point that he suffers from PTSD. The hearing, held remotely via video, was emotional, with another former legislator testifying that the complainant, former Rep. Diego Hernandez, tried to kill himself recently. An independent investigation exonerated Kotek. The drama comes as Kotek, a Portland progressive who was the longest-serving speaker of the House in Oregon history, is in a tight race for governor against Republican nominee Christine Drazan.

AP
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Rising suicide rates among active service members have forced the Pentagon to review the military's mental health protocols. But many service members in crisis still fear coming forward and admitting they need help. And those who do seek that help often find themselves fighting through deep-rooted stigma surrounding mental health issues, bureaucratic obstacles and internal pressure to stay on the job. The Pentagon has created an independent committee to review the military’s mental health and suicide prevention programs. At the same time, a network of military-adjacent charitable organizations has tried to fill the gaps with a variety of programs and outreach efforts.