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Russian President Vladimir Putin has warned officials to strictly observe industrial safety in the wake of last week’s coal mine explosion that killed 51. A methane explosion rocked the Listvyazhnaya mine in the Kemerovo region of southwestern Siberia last week, killing 46 miners and five rescuers in Russia's deadliest accident of the sort since 2010. Most of the bodies are yet to be recovered. A probe has revealed multiple violations of safety norms at the mine, one of Russia’s largest, that included tinkering with methane level indicators in an apparent attempt to keep production going despite the danger of explosion. Putin warned Thursday that those who ignore safety in the run for profits will face punishment.

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A 69-year-old man drifted in choppy waters for nearly a day while clinging to the bottom of his capsized boat until he was saved by the coast guard. Officials say the man was the only one on the boat when it capsized off the resort island of Yakushima. After receiving a call from his colleagues, coast guard rescuers searched for him for nearly a day before spotting him in rough seas about 30 kilometers (18 miles) from the place he disappeared. Televised video of the rescue, provided by the coast guard, showed the man sitting on the bottom of his capsized boat while clinging to its propeller.

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Authorities have searched the home of rocker Marilyn Manson after allegations of physical and sexual abuse by several women. A Los Angeles County sheriff’s statement says investigators seized media storage devices in the search of the Hollywood-area home early Monday morning. Manson, whose legal name is Brian Warner, was not home. The Sheriff’s Department said in February that it had begun investigating incidents of domestic violence against Manson between 2009 and 2011. Several women have publicly alleged this year that they were physically, sexually and emotionally abused by Manson. Manson’s attorney has called allegations against him “provably false.”

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A Russian court has ordered five people to remain in pre-trial detention for two months pending an investigation into a devastating blast in a coal mine in Siberia that resulted in dozens of deaths. Authorities reported 51 deaths after a methane explosion rocked the Listvyazhnaya mine in the Kemerovo region in southwestern Siberia on Thursday. The toll included 46 miners and five rescuers. The tragedy appears to be the deadliest in Russia since 2010. The Central District Court in the city of Kemerovo ruled Saturday to jail the mine's director, his deputy, section supervisor and two state officials. They are accused of violations that resulted in multiple deaths and face up to seven years in prison if convicted. 

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Russian authorities have released the names of 51 presumed victims of a devastating methane explosion in a coal mine in Siberia, a toll that makes the accident the deadliest since 2010. The list with names of 46 miners and five rescuers was published online by the government of the Kemerovo region in southwestern Siberia, where the mine is located. Authorities had initially reported 52 fatalities, but search teams found one survivor Friday morning in what officials described as a “miracle.” Regional officials have declared three days of mourning while Russia’s Investigative Committee has launched a criminal probe into potential safety violations. The director of the mine and two senior managers were detained.

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Russian officials say 52 miners and rescuers have died after a devastating blast in a Siberian coal mine about 250 meters (820 feet) underground. Hours after a methane gas explosion and fire filled the mine with toxic fumes, rescuers found 14 bodies but then were forced to halt the search for 38 others because of a buildup of methane and a high concentration of carbon monoxide gas. The state Tass and RIA-Novosti news agencies cited emergency officials as saying that there was no chance of finding any more survivors. The Interfax news agency cited a representative of the regional administration who also put the death toll from Thursday’s fire at 52, while 239 were rescued.

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The sinking of a boat with more than 30 people on board this week is the deadliest migration tragedy to date in the English Channel. But migrant shipwrecks of that scale are not uncommon in the Mediterranean Sea, where U.N. officials say about 1,600 people have died or gone missing trying to reach Europe this year. The death toll is higher than last year, but by no means unique. The International Organization of Migration estimates that 23,000 people have perished since 2014 while trying to cross the Mediterranean with the help of human smugglers, peaking at more than 5,000 in 2016. In the same seven-year period, about 166 people have died in the English channel.

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At least 31 migrants bound for Britain died when their boat sank in the English Channel, in what France’s interior minister called the biggest tragedy involving migrants on the dangerous crossing to date. Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin said 34 people were believed to have been on the boat. Authorities found 31 bodies and two survivors, and one person appeared to still be missing. The nationalities of the travelers were not immediately known. Four suspected traffickers were arrested on suspicion of being linked to the sunken boat, Darmanin told reporters in the French port city of Calais. Activists demonstrated outside the port of Calais.

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Officials say Brian Laundrie, who was found dead last month in a Florida swamp, shot himself in the head. The medical examiner in Sarasota County, where Laundrie’s body was found, said in a news release Tuesday that the cause of death was a gunshot wound to the head, and the manner of death was suicide. Laundrie’s skeletal remains found in a Florida nature preserve were positively identified last month using dental records. Laundrie had been the subject of a manhunt for more than a month as investigators searched for clues in the slaying of his girlfriend, Gabby Petito, during their cross-country van trip together.

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Spanish rescuers have saved and disembarked more than 400 migrants and asylum seekers to the Canary Islands in the past two days as they attempted to reach the Atlantic Ocean archipelago from West Africa on overcrowded and often unsafe boats. On Tuesday alone, Spain’s Maritime Rescue Service rescued more than 130 people from Africa, including several women and small children, bringing them to the Spanish islands of Gran Canaria and Fuerteventura. The Atlantic route from West Africa to the Canary Islands has been increasingly used by smugglers who launch boats from Morocco, Western Sahara, Mauritania, Senegal and even the Gambia. So far this year, more than 18,000 people have reached the Canary Islands this way.