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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is offering no clues on her plans to send President Donald Trump’s impeachment to the Senate for trial. But she made clear Friday that Democrats intend to move swiftly on Joe Biden’s legislative priorities, including funding for coronavirus vaccines and relief aid. Pelosi said Biden’s proposed $1.9 trillion coronavirus plan is a “matter of complete urgency." That suggests the bill could take precedence over Trump's second impeachment trial. But many Democrats have pushed for an immediate trial. The proceedings could begin by Inauguration Day if Pelosi sends the article to the Senate by early next week. 

Now that the House has impeached President Donald Trump for the second time, Speaker Nancy Pelosi must figure out the best strategy for arguing the case before the Senate. Senate rules say the trial must start soon after the chamber receives the article of impeachment, which cites “incitement of insurrection” after an angry mob of Trump’s supporters invaded the Capitol last week. But Pelosi has not said when the House will deliver it. If the House sends it to the Senate early next week, or before then, a trial could begin at 1 p.m. on Inauguration Day. The ceremony at the Capitol starts at noon.

For a second time, Republican senators face the choice of whether to convict President Donald Trump in an impeachment trial. While only one GOP senator, Utah’s Mitt Romney, voted to convict Trump last year, that number could increase as lawmakers consider whether to punish Trump for his role in inciting a deadly insurrection at the Capitol. Whatever they decide, Trump is likely to be gone from the White House when the verdict comes in. An impeachment trial is likely to start next week, possibly on Inauguration Day, raising the specter of the Senate trying the previous president even as it moves to confirm the incoming president’s Cabinet.

  • Updated

Now that the House has impeached President Donald Trump for the second time, Speaker Nancy Pelosi must figure out the best strategy for arguing the case before the Senate. Senate rules say the trial must start soon after the chamber receives the article of impeachment, which cites “incitement of insurrection” after an angry mob of Trump’s supporters invaded the Capitol last week. But Pelosi has not said when the House will deliver it. If the House sends it to the Senate early next week, or before then, a trial could begin at 1 p.m. on Inauguration Day. The ceremony at the Capitol starts at noon.

For a second time, Republican senators face the choice of whether to convict President Donald Trump in an impeachment trial. While only one GOP senator, Utah’s Mitt Romney, voted to convict Trump last year, that number could increase as lawmakers consider whether to punish Trump for his role in inciting a deadly insurrection at the Capitol. Whatever they decide, Trump is likely to be gone from the White House when the verdict comes in. An impeachment trial is likely to start next week, possibly on Inauguration Day, raising the specter of the Senate trying the previous president even as it moves to confirm the incoming president’s Cabinet.

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President Donald Trump’s impeachment now heads toward a historic Senate trial, perhaps as soon as next week. In a remarkable scene, senators will be serving not only as jurors but witnesses and victims of the deadly Capitol siege. The trial could begin as soon as Inauguration Day, when Democrat Joe Biden will take the oath of office. But the date has not been set and some Democrats suggest waiting. Trump faces a single charge of “incitement of insurrection.” In pursuing conviction, House impeachment managers will be making the case that Trump’s incendiary rhetoric before last week's mob attack was not isolated. Rather, they will say, it was part of an escalating campaign to question the integrity of the U.S. election and overturn the results.

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Three human rights activists have gone on trial in Poland for alleged desecration and offending religious sentiment by adding the LGBT rights movement’s rainbow symbol to posters of a revered Roman Catholic icon and publicly displaying the altered image. The activists have said they created posters that used rainbows to replace the halos in the icon of the Black Madonna and baby Jesus to protest what they saw as the hostility of Poland’s influential Catholic Church toward LGBT people. One of the defendants said in court Wednesday that their 2019 action in the city of Plock was spurred by an installation at a local church that associated LGBT people with crime and negative behavior. 

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Relatives of some of the 36 partygoers killed at a San Francisco Bay Area warehouse fire say prosecutors told them a man accused of illegally converting the warehouse into a cluttered artists enclave is expected to plead guilty later this month. The victims' relatives tell the East Bay Times that Derick Almena is expected to plead guilty to 36 counts of involuntary manslaughter on Jan. 22, ahead of his second trial. Almena was charged with involuntary manslaughter after a fire swept through a party at an Oakland warehouse in December 2016. A jury deadlocked on charges last year. He was released from jail in May over coronavirus concerns. 

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Denmark’s ruling party says it will back a vote in parliament on whether a former immigration minister in the previous government can be tried before the rarely used Court of Impeachment for a 2016 order to separate asylum-seeking couples when one of the pair was a minor. The move by the Social Democrats means they feel they have majority in favor of a trial against Inger Stoejberg, who served as integration minister from June 2015 to 2019. If the vote is successful and Stoejberg is eventually charged and then convicted at a trial, she could face a fine or a maximum two years in prison. Earlier this month, lawyers appointed by parliament said there was a legal basis to charge Stoejberg.