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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has tapped nine of her most trusted allies in the House to argue the case for President Donald Trump’s impeachment. All of the Democrats are lawyers and many of them have deep experience investigating the president. They face the arduous task of convincing skeptical Senate Republicans to convict Trump. A single article of impeachment for “incitement of insurrection” was approved by the House on Wednesday, one week after a violent mob of Trump supporters invaded the Capitol. Lawmakers were counting the votes that cemented Trump’s election defeat at the time.  

For a second time, Republican senators face the choice of whether to convict President Donald Trump in an impeachment trial. While only one GOP senator, Utah’s Mitt Romney, voted to convict Trump last year, that number could increase as lawmakers consider whether to punish Trump for his role in inciting a deadly insurrection at the Capitol. Whatever they decide, Trump is likely to be gone from the White House when the verdict comes in. An impeachment trial is likely to start next week, possibly on Inauguration Day, raising the specter of the Senate trying the previous president even as it moves to confirm the incoming president’s Cabinet.

President Donald Trump’s impeachment now heads toward a historic Senate trial, perhaps as soon as next week. In a remarkable scene, senators will be serving not only as jurors but witnesses and victims of the deadly Capitol siege. The trial could begin as soon as Inauguration Day, when Democrat Joe Biden will take the oath of office. But the date has not been set and some Democrats suggest waiting. Trump faces a single charge of “incitement of insurrection.” In pursuing conviction, House impeachment managers will be making the case that Trump’s incendiary rhetoric before last week's mob attack was not isolated. Rather, they will say, it was part of an escalating campaign to question the integrity of the U.S. election and overturn the results.

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has tapped nine of her most trusted allies in the House to argue the case for President Donald Trump’s impeachment. All of the Democrats are lawyers and many of them have deep experience investigating the president. They face the arduous task of convincing skeptical Senate Republicans to convict Trump. A single article of impeachment for “incitement of insurrection” was approved by the House on Wednesday, one week after a violent mob of Trump supporters invaded the Capitol. Lawmakers were counting the votes that cemented Trump’s election defeat at the time.  

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A bound edition about President Donald Trump’s second impeachment will feature a foreword from an estranged associate — former Trump attorney Michael Cohen. Skyhorse Publishing announced that “The Second Impeachment Report" comes out Feb. 9. The House impeached Trump earlier this week on a single charge, incitement of insurrection, for his alleged role in last week’s bloody attack on the U.S. Capitol by Trump supporters seeking to overturn Trump’s defeat to President-elect Joe Biden. In his foreword to the new book, Cohen writes, “We should never have to call Donald Trump ‘Mr. President’ again after January 20, 2021.”

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FILE- In this May 21, 2020 file photo, Michael Cohen arrives at his Manhattan apartment in New York after being furloughed from prison because of concerns over the coronavirus. A bound edition about President Donald Trump’s second impeachment will feature a foreword from an estranged associate _ former Trump attorney Michael Cohen. Skyhorse Publishing announced that “The Second Impeachment Report" comes out Feb. 9. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)

For a second time, Republican senators face the choice of whether to convict President Donald Trump in an impeachment trial. While only one GOP senator, Utah’s Mitt Romney, voted to convict Trump last year, that number could increase as lawmakers consider whether to punish Trump for his role in inciting a deadly insurrection at the Capitol. Whatever they decide, Trump is likely to be gone from the White House when the verdict comes in. An impeachment trial is likely to start next week, possibly on Inauguration Day, raising the specter of the Senate trying the previous president even as it moves to confirm the incoming president’s Cabinet.

  • Updated

President Donald Trump’s impeachment now heads toward a historic Senate trial, perhaps as soon as next week. In a remarkable scene, senators will be serving not only as jurors but witnesses and victims of the deadly Capitol siege. The trial could begin as soon as Inauguration Day, when Democrat Joe Biden will take the oath of office. But the date has not been set and some Democrats suggest waiting. Trump faces a single charge of “incitement of insurrection.” In pursuing conviction, House impeachment managers will be making the case that Trump’s incendiary rhetoric before last week's mob attack was not isolated. Rather, they will say, it was part of an escalating campaign to question the integrity of the U.S. election and overturn the results.

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Republican Congressman Tom Rice says he backed the House impeachment of President Donald Trump even though he knows it could cost him his seat in his conservative South Carolina district. Rice was one of only 10 House Republicans who joined Democrats in voting for impeachment Wednesday. Rice told The Associated Press on Thursday that he was led to that decision by what he characterized as Trump’s inaction during last week's riot at the U.S. Capitol. Rice said he sought refuge in another congressman's office during the insurrection, watching the live TV coverage and wondering why Trump didn't address the nation and plead with his supporters to stop. 

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FILE - In this Feb. 21, 2019 file photo, U.S. Rep. Tom Rice, R-South Carolina, talks with students in Florence School District Four in Florence, S.C. Rice said Thursday, Jan. 14, 2021 he knows he may lose his seat thanks to his support of the impeachment of President Donald Trump. Rice on Wednesday was one of only 10 House Republicans to join Democrats in voting to impeach the president. (AP Photo/Meg Kinnard, File)