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A late-season wildfire pushed by strong winds has ripped through a tiny central Montana farming town, burning two dozen homes and four grain elevators that had stood for more than a century. Fergus County officials were assessing the damage in Denton on Thursday while crews continued to mop up hot spots in the fire, which had burned 20 square miles of prairie and agricultural land. No one was hurt. About 300 residents were evacuated early Wednesday afternoon when a fire that had started about 6 miles away the night before pushed across the drought-stricken area. The evacuation order was lifted at noon on Thursday. Bridges on the road and railroad tracks west of town burned. 

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In northern Denmark, six stranded customers and about two dozen employees spent the night in a IKEA furniture store, sleeping in the beds that are usually on show. A snowstorm that brought up to 30 centimeters (12 inches) of snow meant that customers and employees were unable to leave when the department store in Aalborg closed on Wednesday evening. They spent the evening watching television and eating, before sleeping in beds in the showroom. The local store manager was quoted as saying that people could “pick the exact bed they always have wanted to try.” . 

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Water agencies in drought-stricken California that serve 27 million residents won't get any of the supplies they've requested from the state heading into 2022 other than what's needed for health and safety. The Wednesday announcement marked the first time the Department of Water Resources has issued a 0% water allocation in December. It reflects the dire conditions as drought continues to grip California and reservoirs sit at historically low levels. The allocations will be adjusted early next year based on how much snow and rain falls during the winter. The 0% allocation could mean mandatory cuts to residents and farmland. 

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FILE - Children sit by a dug out water hole in a dry river bed in the remote village of Fenoaivo, Madagascar, Nov. 11, 2020. Don’t blame climate change for the devastating Madagascar drought and famine, scientists said in a new quick analysis. World Weather Attribution, which does real time studies of extreme weather throughout the world, examined the drought where Madagascar has had only 60% of its normal rainfall from July 2019 to June 2021 and found no statistically significant fingerprint of human-caused climate change. Instead, this was just a random weather quirk, one that has a chance of happening once every 135 years or so, the study said Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021. (AP Photo/Laetitia Bezain)